The Impact of Rape Culture

By Makayla Sundquist

Trigger warning: This article discussing rape culture and violent acts, it may be troubling for survivors. 

“A rapist is always at fault.”

“When someone is raped, it is the fault of the rapist.”

 Yet, American society tends to belittle the victim with accusatory remarks, placing the blame onto the victim. This societal blame is fueled by “Rape Culture,” a term coined in the 1970’s to describe the normalization of sexualized violence in everyday life. “Rape Culture” is the belief that sexual violence is a way of life. You don’t believe me? You say, “I think that rape is bad, so I don’t fuel rape culture…”

Hold on there.  

Continue reading “The Impact of Rape Culture”

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A Message to the Dads

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A Picture of a Super Dad

By Delaney Hopen

 

The Problem

I don’t think it’s easy for people to understand how severe news reports of sexual assault, school shootings, and terrorism are. This separation is similar to receiving news about someone you know who broke their leg. You may discuss how unfortunate it is, ask how it happened, and maybe even discuss the potential challenges they will face in the near future.      However…

Someone breaking their leg doesn’t rock your world.

Someone breaking their leg will not force you to lie awake at night.

Someone breaking their leg can heal.

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Thoughts of violence by the media

Older generations try to blame this lack of sympathy on violent video games, and our generation’s constant attachment to technology. It’s been said that video games like Call of Duty (COD), that “promote” the use of firearms, or Grand Theft Auto (GTA), which displays multiple forms of physical violence, could be the cause of such numbness.

I’ve heard many people try to blame sexual assault and rape on our generation as well, saying that, “This was never a problem when I was your age.”

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Everyone’s Responsibility

Logo for the University of Idaho that says "University of Idaho in gold lettering
U of I logo

By Brianna Love

It’s no secret that there is a lot of drama on the University of Idaho campus right now.  Students are protesting. Students are irritated. Students want their voices to be heard and they want a say in how they are treated on this campus. Things are starting to heat up, and if the students don’t get their way, it may become an even bigger issue.

If you’ve been keeping up with the UI Women’s Center blog, then you already know about the drama surrounding Rob Spear and how the university is handling it. If you are confused, here is a basic rundown:

About five years ago, a female swimmer for the University of Idaho reported sexual assault allegations against a football player to the Athletic Director, Rob Spear. Spear decided to not report it to the Dean of Students Office and claimed because the assault happened off campus, there was nothing he could do to help her. It wasn’t until the female athlete went to the UI Women’s Center that the Dean of Students Office was informed. To this day, Rob Spear is still the athletic director at U of I and has only apologized this year due to pressure from the media. Groups of students have voiced their opinions and signed petitions  stating that they want Spear fired.

There is obviously more to the story; however, this is what is causing all the ruckus on campus.

The issue is not necessarily with the university itself. When it was reported to the Dean of Students Office, things were sort of taken care of. The issue is also not with the athletic department as a whole. The issue is with Rob Spear and why the university has not terminated his employment after 5 years.

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Vandal Family Values

University of Idaho mascot Joe Vandal marching with the marching band behind him.
University of Idaho mascot, Joe Vandal, and the marching band

By Brianna Love

When I was a prospective student for the University of Idaho, I was told that U of I was safe. I was told that this is a great school because we are “one big family.” On the web site it says,

“UI is committed to creating a safe environment for the UI community and those who visit.”

I thought that the university cared about me as one of their students. I thought that I was seen for who I am–not just as a dollar sign. So, in my pre-college mind, if I were to be harmed in any way as one of their students, I assumed the U of I would be there for me.

When incoming freshman start their journey at U of I, they are essentially moving to a new home. They become part of the “Vandal Family.” (At least that is how they feel.) It’s exactly how I felt. U of I was my new home. The Vandals were my family. I would never expect one of them to intentionally hurt me, and if they did, I expected the university to handle it properly…

If we are a family, why wouldn’t you want to protect and stand up for every member?

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A Picture of the American Sex Worker

A diverse group of protests advocating for sex workers rights. Front group holding a sign that says “sex workers rights = human rights.” By Rosemary Anderson

As I write this article, I want to make it known that the sex industry is not always positive for women and girls. According to the U.S. National Library of Medicine, sex workers around the world have a 45 to 75 percent chance of experiencing violence during their careers.

When sex workers do experience violence, they are not protected by rape shield laws and are not eligible for compensation funds.

Many see sex workers as objects, non-human, and second-rate members of society. This makes sex workers even more prone to being victims of violence.

Women are forced into sex work without their consent, others are forced into sex work because of financial situations, and some choose sex work as their profession.

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Harassment in Hollywood

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By Alexandria Arritt 

Hollywood is the cinema capital of the nation, located in Los Angeles, California. Actors and actresses, producers, directors and writers all get their start there. Recent sexual assault allegations have brought to light an epidemic in Hollywood. The revelation began with allegations surfacing against Harvey Weinstein. Harvey Weinstein, director and producer, is just one of the many men being exposed as predators. Since the 1990s, Harvey has been accused of over 100 sexual assaults. Along with Weinstein, there are still many men who continue with their careers after allegations surface. The power structure in Hollywood allows men to act as they wish with little to no consequences.

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The Hunting Ground: Sexual Assault on College Campuses

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Picture Credit: The Hunting Ground documentary showing college students’ march outside UNC against sexual assault

By Samragyee Gautam.

When I first heard about a documentary called “Hunting Ground”, my mind assumed it was some sci-fi story. But it had nothing to do with fantasy or any interesting stories. It is the real and sad truth about sexual assault in college and how, despite being such major problem, universities choose not to take this matter seriously.

The showing of this documentary, organized by Generation Action; a club on campus that advocates for sexual health rights, and sponsored by Dean of Students of University of Idaho, took place this Tuesday on November 07 at the Whitewater Room, Commons. As an active member of the club and a supporter of sex education, I thought it was a powerful and important event. We had a good number of people participate. The one and half hour showing of the documentary was followed by some questions from the audience members to the panelists who covered the topics of the sexual assault rate and reporting on college campuses. Continue reading “The Hunting Ground: Sexual Assault on College Campuses”