Behind The Fields: The Importance of the Bandana Project

 

 

bandana-project
A woman wearing a bandana while working on barbed wire. A title that says, “The Bandana Project”.

 

By Valeria Ramirez

Farmworkers Awareness Week is this week and is currently taking place in our UI campus and other campuses around the United States. This week is to inform other about the dangers and sacrifices that farmworkers have endured. Especially informing the public about the Bandana Project. The main issue that the Bandana Project is handling today is about women who work in the fields and spending hours in the blistering sun picking whatever is in season. As a woman working in the fields, there are many dangers that can occur from dealing with harsh temperatures, underpaid dangerous work, and sadly, they encounter many forms of sexual abuse.

Sexual abuse amongst the farmworker industry is surprisingly common and it’s heartbreaking to hear that many women undergo this treatment. They work day in and day out, doing whatever it takes to feed their families, pay their bills, and support themselves. The working conditions are horrendous and many work for 8 hours non-stop, no breaks or time to rest. Many abusers prey on these women knowing that they can’t do anything to stop them. Some of these abusers work in the fields with them or are supervisors themselves. The supervisors believe that they have some entitlement over these women, which makes them certain that they can get away with whatever they want. Sadly, they hold their power over these women because they know that some migrated illegally or they will be automatically fired if they don’t do whatever they say. This prohibits women from speaking out and taking action because their afraid to lose their job and income. No one should be treated in this manner or should be blackmailed for sexual favors.

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Fighting the Bystander Effect

By Jolie Day

bystander
“Stand. Speak. Act.”

Have you ever seen a person in need of help but thought someone else would eventually step in? What about someone being verbally or physically assaulted because of their race, identity, religion, or gender—and no one tried to help them? Witnessed someone who was visibly intoxicated with no one to be sure they were getting home safely? Have you yourself been in a situation and needed help, but no one seemed to want to get involved? All of these experiences illustrate what is known as the bystander effect.

According to Psychology Today, the bystander effect is a sociological phenomenon that occurs when the presence of others discourages anyone from providing assistance to someone in danger, as there is a perceived diffusion of responsibility amongst them. Devastatingly, this effect can be deadly. With the dangerous uptick in violence since the election, 1 in 4 women and 1 in 33 men on average being sexually assaulted in their lifetime, and nearly 20 people per minute being abused by an intimate partner, it is important to understand what we can do to combat the bystander effect and keep people safe. Continue reading “Fighting the Bystander Effect”

We Need To Address Toxic Masculinity

By Jolie Day

toxic-masculinity
Actor Michael John Madden in “American Male”

In “American Male,” a short film written and directed by Michael Rohrbaugh, a persona is created: an American male college student who is tough, fit, aggressive, and definitely not effeminate. The short film applies a narrative of the different expectations our society has for men and women. This young man is struggling to come to terms with his identity and sexuality within the narrow confines that society provides. The context of this short film is an important discussion, as forms of toxic masculinity arise and have lasting effects for men and societal ramifications for everyone.

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The (Not So Honorable) Honor Code

Universities should have the right to implement their own forms of rules, guidelines, and punishments. If it is a religious-based school then they should have the opportunity to operate under religious constitutions and freedoms. If students sign this contract or attend this university, than they are aware of what they are agreeing to. Seems pretty straightforward and reasonable, right?
Well, unfortunately, this honor code can cause a mess of problems when it comes to unforeseen “consequences” of breaking this honor code. Although I am sure there are many such consequences of this, the one that’s causing the most headlines is rape.

Brigham Young University is currently under fire for its honor code and its lack of 572a8a74091d3.imageintervention for rape victims. Multiple students have come forward saying that when they went to the school about rape allegations, they were threatened with suspension or expulsion for violating the honor code.  Sophomore Madi Barny, who ended up drafting a petition to protest the honor code at Brigham Young University, is one of these many victims. One of her arguments is that the logic of the honor code says that if a victim hadn’t been drinking, hadn’t been in a male’s dorm room, or hadn’t been engaging in other sexual activities, perhaps the rape wouldn’t have occurred. Needless to say, I was horrified when I heard about these cases.
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Question your heroes

By Tess Fox

This article contains graphic language.

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Peyton Manning


Peyton Manning
, Denver Broncos quarterback, has retired. If you can’t think of who is, he’s the football player on the Papa John’s and Nationwide commercials. He’s had a long, successful career without any major scandals that have become typical of NFL players. Well, except for this one time in college. Manning is accused of assaulting a female staff member during his time at University of Tennessee.

Dr. Jaime Naughright (at the time, Jaime Whited) was an athletic trainer at UT while Manning was a student there.

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And the Oscar goes to– changing the awards show status quo

By Madison TeuscherChris Rock holds an Oscar award on a poster with text reading "We all dream in gold".

The most highly sought-after recognition an actor, director, editor, or film musician can achieve is an Oscar. The 88th annual Academy Awards were certainly more subversive than in past years—but, truthfully, this is a welcome change.

Throughout the evening, there were many direct statements about social change, from Leonardo DiCaprio’s comments on the issue of climate change, Kevin Hart’s remarks on diversity, Chris Rock’s monologue about racism in Hollywood, and Lady Gaga’s performance about sexual assault. Continue reading “And the Oscar goes to– changing the awards show status quo”

Porn Taught Me Everything I Know About Sex

By Sam Kennedyimages (1).jpg

Yup, you read the title right. I’ve learned everything there is to know about sex because of porn… just like everybody else.

Pornography has become a teacher in today’s society, thanks to the internet and the increasing use of the “sex sells” attitude within the media. But are we learning the right things from porn?

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