Ruth Bader Ginsburg, the Real Big Deal

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Ruth Bader Ginsburg, otherwise known as RBG, is the second woman ever to be appointed to the Supreme Court. She was appointed by Bill Clinton in 1993 and after the first woman to be appointed to the Supreme Court, Sandra Day O’Connor, retired, she was the only woman on the court for a while. In 1972, Ginsburg co-founded the Women’s Rights Project at the American Civil Liberties Union (ACLU) and, in 1973, she became the ACLU’s general counsel.

The Women’s Rights Project and related ACLU projects participated in over 300 gender discrimination cases by 1974. All the while, RBG was a wife and mother. Within the first few years of this project, Ginsburg fought six cases of discrimination before the Supreme Court, and won five. She chose to focus not just on problems faced by women, but demonstrated that gender inequality was detrimental for both men and women. She took part in expanding the Equal Protection Clause of the Fourteenth Amendment to include women. She also argued for a widower with children who, when his wife passed, was unable to collect any benefits to help him support his dependents. She’s part of the reason that jury duty became mandatory for women as citizens of this nation, and why women in Oklahoma could legally drink at the same age as men. Continue reading “Ruth Bader Ginsburg, the Real Big Deal”

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A Small Win For UI Women

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By Mary Emert

On Wednesday October 31st the ASUI Senate passed a bill that would provide free menstrual products in all Women’s and gender neutral bathrooms at no cost to students. The Senate will have a $300 budget for this semester and the bill’s main advocate Senator Samragyee Guatam is working with UI faculty to keep the bill continuous into the future so that free menstrual products can always be offered at University of Idaho.

I know I for one am grateful for this. While I always try to have a pad or tampon in my backpack or purse, sometimes I just don’t. While I could ask other women around me sometimes it’s just uncomfortable and you never know what kind of products they may or may not have. I have a few times over the last few years even bled through a product that did not last and have had no replacement other than uncomfortable wadded up single ply University of Idaho toilet paper. This bill passing stops that for me and for every other woman who may not be prepared for Aunt Flo’s monthly visit. Taking away from the anxiety inducing question of “What if my period starts in class?” Continue reading “A Small Win For UI Women”

Trans Rights Are Human Rights

Trigger Warning: Discussion of trans-misogyny and violent death: Continue reading “Trans Rights Are Human Rights”

Good News!

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By Mary Emert

On Tuesday November 6th the nation held its midterm elections and the stakes, to some, have never been higher. And, in some places the results have never been better. A record number of women, people of color, and people from the LGBT+ community ran, and a record number of them won as well ushering in new faces to represent America.

Congress will have a record breaking 118 women, next year making up 22% of congress which is a significant jump from the 20% currently in office. Many of these women were inspired after the 2016 election, and many of them are democratic working towards women’s rights to birth control, safe abortion, and equal treatment in politics.

Two of these women, Sharice Davids and Deb Haaland, happen to be Native American both women are very involved in their tribes and interested in the rights of Native Women, who unknown to many have the highest missing and murdered percentages among any minority. Davids also identifies as a lesbian making her the first openly LGBT+ member of Congress from Kansas.

In this she is not alone either. Colorado Democratic Rep. Jared Polis, will be the first openly gay governor of Colorado. Chris Pappas will be New Hampshire’s first openly gay member of Congress. Lesbian Angie Craig defeats anti-LGBTQ congressman in Minnesota, will be first openly gay person elected to Congress from the state. Two transgender women, Gerri Cannon and Lisa Bunker, were elected to the New Hampshire House of Representatives. According to the Los Angeles Blade, Cannon and Bunker will join Virginia state Del. Danica Roem as the only openly trans members of any U.S. state legislature. Democrats Susan Ruiz and Brandon Woodard become the first LGBT+ members of Continue reading “Good News!”

Pro-Choice vs Pro-Life

By: Madeleine Clow

Pro-choice vs pro-life is a highly controversial social issue that the United States debates over continuously. Abortions have been a part of American legal history since as early as the 1820s. The first law against abortions was instated in 1821, in Connecticut, targeting apothecaries who sold “poisons” to purposely induce a miscarriage. Coming into the 20th century, some states had anti-abortion laws emplaced until the Supreme Court’s decision in the Roe vs Wade trial of 1973. The Supreme Court’s decision decriminalized abortion nationwide.

Later with the 1992 Supreme Court’s decision in the case of Planned Parenthood vs Casey, emplaced the original guidelines of the laws on abortions nationwide. In the 2016 Supreme Court decision in the Whole Woman’s Health vs Hellerstedt case, led us to the abortion laws we have in place today. Each state has their own laws pertaining to abortion in the United States. Most of the common state-level laws regarding abortion are parental consent for minors, mandating counseling meant to persuade women from continuing with the abortion, limitations on public funding, excess regulations on abortion facilities, and a mandated waiting period before the abortion. Continue reading “Pro-Choice vs Pro-Life”

Suicide Rates in America

By: Madeleine Clow

Disclaimer: This article may be triggering and handles sensitive issues regarding mental health

Continue reading “Suicide Rates in America”

LGBTQIA+ Rights in Idaho

By: Madeleine Clow

It came to my attention earlier this year, simply by mistake, that the LGBTQIA+ community is not protected by hate crime laws in the state of Idaho. I have lived in Idaho as long as I have been out of the closet, since 2015. Same-sex relationships have been legal in Idaho, but same-sex marriage has not, until the Supreme Court’s decision to legalize Gay Marriage under federal law, nationally in 2015. I honestly believe that if same-sex marriage had not been legalized nationally, that it would still be illegal today in the state of Idaho.

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Idaho capitol building lit in support of Pride Month

When I learned that my life was not protected under law by discrimination due to my sexuality, I felt very unsafe in the environment that I call home. I began to research what other rights the LGBTQIA+ community has been excluded from, and I was astonished to find out that Idaho does not prohibit housing discrimination based on sexual orientation and gender identity. Idaho does not protect from employment discrimination, or public and school harassment and discrimination, and conversion therapy is still legal.

Continue reading “LGBTQIA+ Rights in Idaho”