Inspiration by Impact: A Highlight of Three Modern Female Musicians

three female musicians framed alongside one another
Left to Right: Liz Harris, Quay Dash, Kelly Moran

By Remington Jensen

For decades the work of female musicians has been undermined by the work of their male counterparts, yet in the 90s, 00s and now the 10s that will soon move into the 20s the music industry — and music as a whole — is straying away from an ongoing landscape that has been long dominated by men. The transition however could not be possible without forward thinking and passionate musicians, and in this article I have decided to take note of a few of these creative female producers that to me are pioneering this changing battleground of sound!

Continue reading “Inspiration by Impact: A Highlight of Three Modern Female Musicians”

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Trans Rights Are Human Rights

Trigger Warning: Discussion of trans-misogyny and violent death: Continue reading “Trans Rights Are Human Rights”

In Line for the Clubs of Tomorrow: The Era of SOPHIE

red headed dj SOPHIE performs at Coachella 2016 in a black leather jacket
SOPHIE at Coachella 2016, by Samuel Long

By Remington Jensen

For a sizable portion of modern music culture, transgender artists have had to work harder than cisgender artists while receiving less recognition and praise for similar performances of their skills and talents. Yet in 2018 and the years that now will follow, artists such as Scottish  DJ, singer and producer SOPHIE (stylized in all capitals) are attempting to take a commanding hold on the industry and orient their power into a new realm of acceptance.

Continue reading “In Line for the Clubs of Tomorrow: The Era of SOPHIE”

Gender and Role Play in Kids

Colorful graphic of androgynous figures illustrating different genders
Graphic illustrating different genders

By Beatrice Santiago 

Do you remember when you were 9 years old?

I vaguely remember what I was doing at that age. And I remember experiences in which I felt inferior to men, thinking as a young girl that I was not capable of certain tasks just because I was a girl. Society’s ideals can be cruel. Especially when you are told that if you do something a man does, you are not “acting like a lady.”

I recently read an article, “I AM 9 YEARS OLD: Children Across the World Tell Us How Gender Affects Their Lives.”  As the title implies, children were asked questions like:

“What is the best thing about being a girl?”

“What is the worst thing about being a girl?”

“How might your life be different if you were a boy (or a boy instead of a girl)?”

Their responses were shocking. However, they were answers I was expecting. Although many were positive, some were really sad to read. These children were interviewed from all different parts of the world by National Geographic.

Continue reading “Gender and Role Play in Kids”

The Art of Passing

By Olivia Comstock

7a46522b1fd129f3f6f642748db4abe1.jpg
A comic about the notion of passing
gender_adventures__the_unobtainability_of_passing_by_jammyscribbler-da7k9j2.jpg
Another comic about passing

Passing is about performance. Passing is about presentation. Passing is about appearance and external markers of identity. Because most of the world only knows each of us through how we look, and we never get to explain our inner nuances to them, then they only see us for what we are the outside. They make assumptions for what our outward selves signify for our inner selves. Our identity and beliefs are assumed from a quick glance. Usually people think of gender or race with the topic of passing, but passing can involve a huge range of personal characteristics, including race, ethnicity, gender, sex, sexuality, religion, disability or ability, job occupation, level of education, intelligence, economic class, and social status. Passing can signify any personal characteristic of identity.

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I am a Supportive Feminist

by Kali Nelson

red code for a computer that says end patriarchy.
A sign written in code.

My lipstick, I pick it out carefully every morning.

All the shades of red and pink remind me that

I am the decedent of warriors.

My mother was a warrior

And her mother before her.

They did not use lipstick to armor up.

They used a little pink ribbon.

But my lipstick is my armor.

Without it I feel naked, defenseless.

My feminism is a lot like my lipstick,

I sometimes water it down as to not offend.

From blood red to pastel pink

I know I shouldn’t but I do.

I am most offensive in my head.

Always set to my darkest red.

I do not control my thoughts in my head, but I censor myself when in crowds.

But do not think I do this for you. I do this for me,

Because I do not want to fight today

My feminism is ready to combat all the stereotypes.

Don’t tell me I cannot,

If you do, get ready to watch me do it.

Oh dad,

Thank you for telling me I could be whatever I wanted

You’ve raised an ambitious woman.

But did you have to say you think it’d take me five years to graduate?

Because now dad,

I have to do it in four. Continue reading “I am a Supportive Feminist”

A Discussion of Language and Inclusion with Activist Madeline Scyphers

Last week I had the privilege to meet with Madeline Scyphers, an activist for the queer community. I had a lot of questions about her community, and Madeline had a lot of answers. I started out by asking Madeline what her identities are so I could get an idea of where she is coming from. She has many, and her response was, “I identify as trans. I identify somewhere between a transwoman and someone who identifies as nonbinary transfeminine. What that means to me is I do feel like the binary gender system of being a man or a woman does not necessarily fit me as a descriptor all the time. I never identify as someone who is a man  or a boy, and I really hate it when someone does gender me that way.”

That’s just one aspect of her identity. When I asked her about her sexual orientation, she responded, “The best word I use is queer. I do and have always primarily dated women, but I’m attracted to most people, at least some of the time, but not all people all of the time. Bi and pan don’t really encompass that; only if you explain it to someone. Since I have to explain it to someone anyways, because it’s [the terms bi and pan] implying things that I don’t want it to imply, why don’t you just use the term queer, which is purposefully vague? I can use it, and you don’t make assumptions about what it means.” There’s more to Madeline than her sexual orientation and gender identity. Madeline said, “I also identify as an activist, I am a math student, and that’s really important to me, and it plays into a larger identity of feeling like kind of a nerd.” Continue reading “A Discussion of Language and Inclusion with Activist Madeline Scyphers”