Why Masturbate?

By Kate Ringer

After writing about how to masturbate a few weeks ago, I realized that I have some biases about masturbation. First of all, I generally believe that masturbation is a healthy thing that everyone should practice. Secondly, I think that the vast majority of cis-males masturbate, cis-females are much less likely to, and I have no predictions on the rate of masturbation for individuals who didn’t identify as cisgender. To address these biases, I decided to distribute a short survey that asked the following questions:

  1. What is your gender identity?
  2. Have you ever experimented with masturbation?
  3. Have you masturbated in the past 30 days?
  4. Why do you choose to masturbate or not masturbate?

Continue reading “Why Masturbate?”

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How to Masturbate

By Kate Ringer

This article contains sexually explicit content. The purpose of this guide is to help people of all genders and sexual orientations practice masturbation; however, everyone is different. Some readers may be comfortable with these topics, while others who have experienced trauma, body dysmorphia, or sexism may not be. If you have any questions, please leave them in the comments, and I will answer them to the best of my ability. Some other great resources are Sexplanations for great sex education content, Adam & Eve for sex toys, Planned Parenthood for education and medical services, and/or a healthcare professional in your area. Now, it’s about to get real, so find a private place to read this and let’s get started.

We’re going to start by establishing a mantra. Think yogi style, but for accepting your genitals. My vulva is a goddess. I love my penis. I am perfect. These are some examples; use whatever feels right for your gender and sexual identity. Say this mantra a few times to yourself, out loud if you can. If you aren’t comfortable doing that, it’s ok, just repeat it a few times in your head.

Breath in. My vulva is a goddess.

Breath out. My vulva is a goddess.

Breath in. My vulva is a goddess.

Breath out. My vulva is a goddess.

Continue reading “How to Masturbate”

Porn: Addiction and the War on Women

By Vicky Diloné

FTND_TriggerWarning

When looking into the sex industry, abuses can be found. There is mention of sexual assault and rape in this post but nothing explicit. Several of the links do contain graphic content used to illustrate the realities of the industry. Proceed with caution.

Every day, we are bombarded by sex. In advertisements for fast food or perfume, in TV show plots and music, sex follows us everywhere. At a time where it seems we are talking about sex more than ever, there is still a taboo that many are reluctant to bring up. Porn. Often confined to locker room talk with the guys, no one really talks about it in a critical sense. When was the last time you had nice dinner conversation about the good old topic of porn? How many would admit to family members or employers the amount of time watching people engage in sexual activity on screen? I think there needs to be a critical talk about pornography. I don’t mean from a religious moral standpoint nor do I want to talk about censorship. I want to talk about the science of the brain and the psychological and societal impact on men and women.

Defining Pornography

“I shall not today attempt further to define [obscenity]; and perhaps I could never succeed in intelligibly doing so. But I know it when I see it”

–former U.S. Supreme Court justice Potter Stewart

It’s important to define the problem before coming up with solutions. The definition of pornography or obscenity in general has been debated in courts for decades. For this post, I am using the definition Matt Fradd uses in his book The Porn Myth: “visual material containing explicit displays of sexual organs or sexual activities, whether real or simulated, in order to arouse erotic rather than aesthetic sensations.”

1_uWXnKgxUhCmvQQDQaVf-zgThe Addicted Brain

There have been many studies on pornography and Internet addiction with lengthy talk about how the brain reacts to certain stimuli and the chemicals released. Fradd provides a concise explanation on how pornography triggers addiction:

“When researchers compared brain scans of porn users with scans of nonusers, they found that the more porn the person had used, the less his reward center activated when porn images were flashed on screen. ‘This is in line with the hypothesis that intense exposure of pornographic stimuli results in a down regulation of the natural neural response to sexual stimuli.’

With a dulled reward center, a person can’t feel the effects of dopamine as well as they used to. As a result, the porn a person is using can stop producing the same excitement it did before. This leads many users to go in search of more hardcore material to get a bigger dopamine burst.” Continue reading “Porn: Addiction and the War on Women”

Sex, Drugs, and Spring Break

A crowded beach in Mexico where there is no visible sand there are so many people
A crowded beach in Mexico, a popular spring break destination

By Chloe Rigg

                                                 Okay                                                 
Just a little pinprick
There’ll be no more, ah
But you may feel a little sick…

There is no pain you are receding
A distant ship, smoke on the horizon
You are only coming through in waves
Your lips move but I can’t hear what you’re saying

 

Pink Floyd’s famous song “Comfortably Numb” is either psychedelic, groovy, and melodic. Or, it is the “devils music” encouraging drug use {depending on who you talk to}. These lyrics are a perfect example of the 70’s “sex, drugs, and rock n’ roll” scene. This trend has been carried into 2018. Though it’s now more sex, drugs, and hip-hop. Spring break is seen as an iconic event in college culture, and it is where the sex, drugs, and hip-hop scene is most influential on students.

But, is this spring break culture inherent in every college student, or is the way we were taught {rather lack of teaching} about topics like sex and drugs what leads us to this dangerous partying?

Continue reading “Sex, Drugs, and Spring Break”

Does Opinion and Religion Triumph Over Facts and Data?

Women's Center- Planned Parenthood
The State of Sex Education

By Sierra Rothermich

A dozen University of Idaho students in the Planned Parenthood Generation Action group drove nearly 300 miles to the Idaho State Capitol to lobby a bill allowing women to receive up to a 12-month supply of prescribed birth control and promote better sex education on college campuses, according to the New York Times. However, when the students arrived Republican State Senator, Dan Foreman, canceled the scheduled meeting and yelled at the students.

“I’m a Roman Catholic and a conservative Republican. I think what you guys are doing stinks,” Foreman said in a video taken by a Generation Action member, according to The Argonaut.

According to ABC News, the other state lawmakers, even if they disagreed, honored their plan to meet with the students and hear what they had to say. Republican State Senator, Bob Nonini, respectfully disagreed with students and talked about abstinence being an alternative to contraceptives. Continue reading “Does Opinion and Religion Triumph Over Facts and Data?”

Safer Sex-in a New Millennium – How to Teach LGBTQ+ Safer Sex Practices

1
Picture Courtesy: Taken from Walden, eating disorders treatment Website.

By Samragyee Gautam.

As someone who believes in sexual health education and its need among college students, I believe that everyone especially students must have enough resources to get adequate information about safer sexual health. My past few posts on this topic reflect that there isn’t enough information or knowledge among students regarding safer sexual practices. Now imagine the knowledge or resources one might have who identifies as an LGBTQ community member!

Even in the present world, which is considered more open and welcoming to the community, there are some problems of discrimination and exclusion that the people of LGBTQ community still face. With that being said, there must be some special efforts that are to be made so that sexual health issues are properly and timely addressed. One of those efforts is the event or session that is organized by Inland Oasis this coming Sunday on Nov 19 from 12pm to 3 pm at 1912 Center Moscow, Idaho. Continue reading “Safer Sex-in a New Millennium – How to Teach LGBTQ+ Safer Sex Practices”

WHAT YOUR PARENTS DID NOT TELL YOU!

 

1
Picture Courtesy: Facebook page of the event posted by Women Center’s 

By Samragyee Gautam.

In the light of how important sex education is, especially for women, the Women’s Center at The University of Idaho has been organizing various events related to this topic. Lo Que tus Padres No te Dijeron, translated as What Your Parents Didn’t Tell You, is one of the programs co-hosted by the Women Center(WC), the Office of Multicultural Affairs(OMA) and Campus Assistance Migrant Program(CAMP) for students; especially Latinx Students as Latin Heritage Month is celebrated at the UofI from Sep 15 to Oct 15. Previously, WC used to organize a somewhat similar sex-ed event or forum called “GOT-SEX?” that focused on topics of sexual health, birth control, social pressures, and sexual practices. However, it was not focused to a specific student group.

According to Bekah Miller MacPhee; the OVW Project Director, who is coordinating this program, WC, OMA and CAMP came up with the idea as a group. Various surveys and focus groups were held in the spring of 2014 related to sexual education among women of color who also had different cultural backgrounds. This resulted in the fact that Latinx students were under served, both men and women. That’s how it got started three years ago; however, this is the first time this event is called/named in this particular way. Continue reading “WHAT YOUR PARENTS DID NOT TELL YOU!”