The Period Taboo

A figurine of a womans body in front of bokeh lights.

 

By: Madelyn Starritt

Recently, I talked about the company Thinx and all they do and reviewed one of their products, the period underwear. I want to continue this conversation and talk about periods.

That’s right, the monthly gift women get that ruins our clothes, causes us pain, and tells us we aren’t pregnant. Periods are natural and most of us get them. Yet, for some reason, we aren’t supposed to talk about them. God forbid we actually educate girls about their health but, unfortunately, periods make men uncomfortable so we aren’t supposed to talk about it.

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Finally, a holiday I can get behind

A collage of the author's girlfriends, comprising eight pictures in total.
A collage of the author’s friends

By Kali Nelson

I’m going to come right out and say it: I love my friends. They mean the world to me, but not in a romantic way. It’s more of a platonic love that I have for them. “I love you” has a lot going for it, it says so much, considering it’s only three words. The ancient Greeks were onto something here—they had six (yes, six) different words for love. But the one I would like to focus on is Philia.

I bring this up because Tuesday was Valentine’s Day—a day that focuses on romantic love or for the ancient Greeks, either Eros, a sexual love; Ludus, a young love; and Pragma, the kind of love you have after years together. But Philia is underrepresented. From a young age, children are teased about having a girlfriend or a boyfriend, but we forget that we can love people and still be just their friend. Continue reading “Finally, a holiday I can get behind”

Listen, She’s Not Into You, Okay?

IMG_2543 (3).PNGWhen I say the word “no”, I mean it. Unless someone is offering some of their food, because in that case I’m just trying to be polite. But in almost every other situation, the word no means what the dictionary says it means. No is equivalent to no, a definitive denial or refusal towards, for, or about something. This principle of saying the word “no” and meaning it applies to everything, except interactions between a man and a woman when she says she is not interested. When a man is pursuing a woman either romantically, sexually, or both, it seems like the word “no” and the phrase “no thank you” or even the utterance of “no I am not interested” is hardly taken seriously. Apparently in our society “no” means “yes sir, keep trying, I’ll come around.” Continue reading “Listen, She’s Not Into You, Okay?”

Vagina Love

By Tatiana Rodriguez

For some reason, I have always been afraid of feminism. I always thought of it as a burning bra type of movement. I can remember my freshman year associating the Women’s Center with that far-fetched idea. Same with “The Vagina Monologues.” I never went to a show all throughout my collegiate career because I was scared how it would look if I was buying tickets for a show with “vagina” in the title. I was always scared of what other people thought of me.

Another reason I never went was because I always had to work and was never done with work until 8 or 9 pm. Now in my senior year, with a new outlook on feminism and being a woman, I have no excuse to miss this show. Going in, I’m not quite sure what to expect, so this post is a two part. It has both my ideas before and after attending the show.

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A Post-Heterosexual Vision of Love

 

queer-a-graphic-history-interview-body-image-1473867446-size_1000
A comic about gender being performative

By Olivia Comstock

Every part of our lives is stereotyped and put into boxes – our class, our education, our gender, our sexuality, and our love. This is frustrating and wrong because love should be the most free, open, and genuine part of life. Instead, it is limited by strict normalized gender roles and heteronormativity. These place implied expectations and create assumptions based on one’s role as the man or the woman in the relationship. Because of this, the possibilities of what love can be are limited. Openness, comfort, and self-love on the individual level also create these characteristics in a relationship. However, these traits are stifled by what is considered “normal” and people’s attempts to conform to it. There is potential to expand the possibilities of how people love through looking at the queer community and through a vision of a post-heterosexual world. I acknowledge that this is a very broad topic. I am only going to do a brief survey of how I think queerness could help us move beyond the boundaries and institutions in place today, but I am aware of the infiniteness of this topic.

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Changing The World One Period At A Time

This is a photo of underwear, tampons, and pads
Photo: Madelyn Starritt

 

By: Madelyn Starritt

Products for people with periods, Thinx is a company based in NYC that makes underwear to wear during menstruation. They sell these period panties to women who want them and provide period products to girls who need them.

Co-founded by the CEO Miki Agrawal, Thinx started in 2014 to break the period taboo. They offer an online store that sells period panties (underwear to wear while menstruating) and other period products. They also work with afripads for every pair sold to provide affordable, reusable pads to girls in developing countries.

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Waking up to REALiti

Picture of Grimes next to two keyboards
The music artist Grimes

By Valeria Ramirez

Grimes is an underappreciated synth pop rocker who uses a bizarre but unique style to push the music scene forward into neon enlightenment. I came across Grimes when I was looking for new music to add to my playlist, and during that time I’ve been seeing her album Art Angels almost everywhere. Upon first listening to her album, I absolutely disliked her music. I just found it a little too different for my taste, since I mostly listen to the Rock and Indie genres. So I left it in my playlist, never to return again. Until last year, I was playing whatever was on my Spotify and one of Grimes’ song caught my attention. Kill v. Maim was addictive and refreshing to hear. The upbeat electro sound and the clashing of the snare drum is mixed with a pop fairy-like voice that leaves her audience in a fighting, dreamlike mood. Ever since then, I’ve been a huge fan of her music.

Grimes, also known by her family as Clair Elise Boucher, is a Canadian self-taught musician who produced music before becoming an artist. Grimes has always worked in the underground music scene where she built her following. Being a self-taught musician and producer allowed her to create everything that she sings. Even the album artwork is all her own—she is an inspired producer and artist who takes her craft and skill to its limits.

Continue reading “Waking up to REALiti”