Vagina Love

By Tatiana Rodriguez
For some reason, I have always been afraid of feminism. I always thought of it was a burning bra type of movement. I can remember my freshmen year associating the Women’s Center with that far-fetched idea. Same with the Vagina Monologues. I never went to a show all throughout my collegiate career because I was scared it would look if I was buying tickets for a show with “vagina” in the title. I was always scared of what other people thought of me.
Another reason I never went was because I always had to work and was never done with work until 8 or 9 pm. Now in my senior year, with a new outlook on feminism and being a women, I have no excuse to miss this show. Going in, I’m not quite sure what to expect, so this post is a two part. It has both my ideas before and after attending the show.

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A Post-Heterosexual Vision of Love

 

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A comic about gender being performative

By Olivia Comstock

Every part of our lives is stereotyped and put into boxes – our class, our education, our gender, our sexuality, and our love. This is frustrating and wrong because love should be the most free, open, and genuine part of life. Instead, it is limited by strict normalized gender roles and heteronormativity. These place implied expectations and create assumptions based on one’s role as the man or the woman in the relationship. Because of this, the possibilities of what love can be are limited. Openness, comfort, and self-love on the individual level also create these characteristics in a relationship. However, these traits are stifled by what is considered “normal” and people’s attempts to conform to it. There is potential to expand the possibilities of how people love through looking at the queer community and through a vision of a post-heterosexual world. I acknowledge that this is a very broad topic. I am only going to do a brief survey of how I think queerness could help us move beyond the boundaries and institutions in place today, but I am aware of the infiniteness of this topic.

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Changing The World One Period At A Time

This is a photo of underwear, tampons, and pads
Photo: Madelyn Starritt

 

By: Madelyn Starritt

Products for people with periods, Thinx is a company based in NYC that makes underwear to wear during menstruation. They sell these period panties to women who want them and provide period products to girls who need them.

Co-founded by the CEO Miki Agrawal, Thinx started in 2014 to break the period taboo. They offer an online store that sells period panties (underwear to wear while menstruating) and other period products. They also work with afripads for every pair sold to provide affordable, reusable pads to girls in developing countries.

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Waking up to REALiti

Picture of Grimes next to two keyboards
The music artist Grimes

By Valeria Ramirez

Grimes is an underappreciated synth pop rocker who uses a bizarre but unique style to push the music scene forward into neon enlightenment. I came across Grimes when I was looking for new music to add to my playlist, and during that time I’ve been seeing her album Art Angels almost everywhere. Upon first listening to her album, I absolutely disliked her music. I just found it a little too different for my taste, since I mostly listen to the Rock and Indie genres. So I left it in my playlist, never to return again. Until last year, I was playing whatever was on my Spotify and one of Grimes’ song caught my attention. Kill v. Maim was addictive and refreshing to hear. The upbeat electro sound and the clashing of the snare drum is mixed with a pop fairy-like voice that leaves her audience in a fighting, dreamlike mood. Ever since then, I’ve been a huge fan of her music.

Grimes, also known by her family as Clair Elise Boucher, is a Canadian self-taught musician who produced music before becoming an artist. Grimes has always worked in the underground music scene where she built her following. Being a self-taught musician and producer allowed her to create everything that she sings. Even the album artwork is all her own—she is an inspired producer and artist who takes her craft and skill to its limits.

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Ecofeminism and You

by Kali Nelson

 

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A picture of Earth from the moon

 

Have you ever wondered if there was a way to combine your environmental activism with your feminist work? Does it seem to be never ending, running from one protest to another? If this is your problem, think about becoming an ecofeminist.

What is ecofeminism about?

Ecofeminism has four principal belief according to Ynestra King in The Ecology of Feminism:

The first one is that the building of western civilization by making it in opposition of nature, reinforces the subjugation of women.

The second belief is that life is a web, not a hierarchy.

The third is that a healthy ecosystem must maintain diversity to survive.

The last belief is that our survival depends on our understanding of our relationship with nature.

 

While these are the four beliefs put forth by King that does not mean that ecofeminism cannot have some variation between people.

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Stronger Without Them

My ultimate vice is a good f**k boy who’s going to treat me like shit when I know I deserve better. I love then picking myself up and going for someone who has lower self-esteem than I do. It’s a deadly cycle that I have found myself repeating for quite sometime now. But for almost a year, I have given myself some time to think, and have realized why I love it so much. Continue reading “Stronger Without Them”

Gender Roles in Abstract Expressionism

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Abstract Expressionist artist Jackson Pollock’s iconic painting

By Olivia Comstock

When we think of the 1950s today, we think of a time of extremely biased gender stereotypes and strict gender roles. This affected every aspect of life, including one’s daily routine, school, politics, culture, movies, and even art. However, there are more nuances to the gender dynamic in the 1950s than simply very masculine men and very feminine women. Within the Abstract Expressionist art movement, women were treated similar to how they were in general society, but the expectations on them were more complex. Being both women and artists allowed the social requirements for women to be placed on them while also having to play the role of the artist. Simultaneously, they were supposed to be mothers and wives because they were women, but at the same time were not supposed to be mothers or wives because they were artists. They were supposed to support their husbands, many of whom were artists, but if they wanted to be taken seriously then they should prioritize their own art. Additionally, because of the subject matter of Abstract Expressionism, women were not only navigating the art world and social world, but they were also featured as negative themes in many paintings by men.

Abstract Expressionist was a prominent avant-garde art movement in New York City during the 1950s in the United States. Even though this movement features primarily male artists, female artists complicated the expectations of their gender. The gender dynamics of the 1950s in America were deeply imbedded within Abstract Expressionism through interactions between the artists and through the art itself. Men, such as William de Kooning, Jackson Pollock, Barnett Newman, and Mark Rothko, dominated Abstract Expressionism. All of these artists projected extreme masculinity through their art practice and mannerisms. At the same time, several female artists, such as Elaine de Kooning, Joan Mitchell, and Lee Krasner, were aware of this and were trying to find a space for themselves and for success through their own work.

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