E.M.P.O.W.E.R.

Empowered Women Empower Women
A Photo of “Empowered Women Empower Women”

 

By Sierra Rothermich
A son and his father are in a horrible car accident. The father dies on impact and the son is rushed to the hospital with severe injuries. The surgeon looks at the son when he arrives at the hospital and says “I can’t operate on him, he’s my son.”

Can you explain this? 

 

Continue reading “E.M.P.O.W.E.R.”

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Looking Through The Eyes Of An Anti-Feminist

Women of the world unite
A Photo of a Feminist March

By Sierra Rothermich

I’m going to ask you to do something difficult…

Something individuals rarely do, but it is of great importance…

Up for the challenge?

Try to understand a different perspective — look through the eyes of an anti-feminist.

According to the Merriam-Webster dictionary, feminism is defined as “the theory of political, economic and social equality of the sexes.” However, some women don’t consider themselves feminists. In fact, there is a website called womenagainstfeminism.com dedicated to expressing anti-feminist views. According to a national survey by the Washington Post and Kaiser Family Foundation, six in ten women and one third of men consider themselves a feminist or strong feminist. About seven in ten people said they thought the movement was empowering.

However, four in ten Americans said the movement is angry and unfairly blames men for women’s challenges. A writer on womenagainstfeminism.com explains, “modern-day feminism has taken a different path that I cannot relate to.”

So here is the challenge — Let’s try to understand this perspective. Take a moment with me to look through the eyes of an anti-feminist.

Continue reading “Looking Through The Eyes Of An Anti-Feminist”

Schools & Gender Inequality

An illustration of a little boy playing with a toy car and a little girl playing with a doll.
Gender Stereotype

By Brianna Love

I had just started my junior year of high school. It was my first year in a public school, for I had been practically raised in a private Christian school. Due to the fact that I went to a private school, I had always worn school uniforms. Therefore, I didn’t know what was “acceptable clothing” to wear at public schools. I had worn a tank top, ripped jeans, and flip flops. It was nothing I would consider “sexy.” I didn’t think it was distracting. However, the campus security stopped me on my way to class. They took me to their office and said that the tank top was a violation of dress code and I had the option to: (1) call a parent and wait for them to bring me something else to wear, (2) spend the rest of the day in their office, or (3) have a parent take me home. That didn’t seem fair to me. My education was being inhibited because my shoulders were “too distracting” to the men in my classes.

Ever since then, the question haunts me…

Why is there a double standard between males and females when it comes to dress code?

This was a big issue for me because the reason behind the rule that they gave to me was that it “distracts the male students from their education.”

Continue reading “Schools & Gender Inequality”

Gender and Role Play in Kids

Colorful graphic of androgynous figures illustrating different genders
Graphic illustrating different genders

By Beatrice Santiago 

Do you remember when you were 9 years old?

I vaguely remember what I was doing at that age. And I remember experiences in which I felt inferior to men, thinking as a young girl that I was not capable of certain tasks just because I was a girl. Society’s ideals can be cruel. Especially when you are told that if you do something a man does, you are not “acting like a lady.”

I recently read an article, “I AM 9 YEARS OLD: Children Across the World Tell Us How Gender Affects Their Lives.”  As the title implies, children were asked questions like:

“What is the best thing about being a girl?”

“What is the worst thing about being a girl?”

“How might your life be different if you were a boy (or a boy instead of a girl)?”

Their responses were shocking. However, they were answers I was expecting. Although many were positive, some were really sad to read. These children were interviewed from all different parts of the world by National Geographic.

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Gender inclusive housing

By Kali Nelson

A brick building meant for students to live at on a college campus.
A side photo of dorms building on a college campus.

When you think about it, housing options are a small thing in the larger scheme of going to college. In between filling out my FAFSA for the first headache inducing time to finding a decent packing list that didn’t cost upwards of $100, I didn’t think about where I would live. I knew for sure it would be on campus because freshmen are required to live on campus at the University of Idaho, and I went in knowing no one, so off campus wasn’t an option.

But as a straight cis-identifying woman, I didn’t think about if I would be comfortable with my new roommate, because I knew it would be another female like myself. Continue reading “Gender inclusive housing”

A Picture of the American Sex Worker

A diverse group of protests advocating for sex workers rights. Front group holding a sign that says “sex workers rights = human rights.” By Rosemary Anderson

As I write this article, I want to make it known that the sex industry is not always positive for women and girls. According to the U.S. National Library of Medicine, sex workers around the world have a 45 to 75 percent chance of experiencing violence during their careers.

When sex workers do experience violence, they are not protected by rape shield laws and are not eligible for compensation funds.

Many see sex workers as objects, non-human, and second-rate members of society. This makes sex workers even more prone to being victims of violence.

Women are forced into sex work without their consent, others are forced into sex work because of financial situations, and some choose sex work as their profession.

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How to make the UI more inclusive

A diverse group of UI students pose in front of the Admin Building.
UI students pose in front of the Admin Building.

By Rosemary Anderson 

For me and many others, receiving an education from the University of Idaho is one of the best gifts we’ve ever been given. The campus is beautiful, the faculty and staff are welcoming, and the student body is diverse–or is it?

According to the numbers, 71% of students are white and only 29% of students are people of color. For a national average, 58% of all college students in America are white and the remaining 42% are people of color. From the 1970s to today, these percentages have been shifting more towards middle ground.

Although the diversity numbers for the UI may be a little higher than other universities, it’s not something to be proud of, at least not yet.

After talking to a few professors on campus, I learned that the faculty at the UI is disparagingly white as well. I was told that there are only about two dozen faculty of color. So how can we make our classrooms more inclusive?

Continue reading “How to make the UI more inclusive”