Sexual Assualt

 

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Screenshot of SOS on iPhone

By Beatrice Santiago 

 

Sexual Assault is real, people, and unfortunately, it happens everywhere. Including here.

As a college student, I walk to campus all the time. (Even at times where it can be very scary.) I can’t even tell you the times I have checked my surroundings, over and over again while going home, after a late night at the library. From wanting to listen to my music as I walk, but having to put only one headphone in, just in case. From taking classes to learn how to defend myself, because women, unfortunately, get put in danger more than men do. I must take an extra step and extra precautions, just because I am a woman. I always try to look for resources that can help me if a predator decided to attack me by surprise.

Not long ago, my sister told me a capability I was not aware of. On Iphones, you click the power button five times in a row and the image above will pop up. By sliding the SOS button on your IPhone, this will send your location to the nearest police station. I also have learned how to carry my keys between my thumbs. I even learned about a bra with a sensor in it that can alert the police if your heart rate is too high over a long period of time. (Signaling the police.) I must do this and many more things to feel safe. Even the way I act and dress. I always have to have an extra layer of protection before I can go outside because I am not sure what could happen. I should not have to live like this!! All women should have the ability to do whatever they desire.

My question is: Why do I find myself needing to do this? (Right, because I am a woman and because men don’t have to worry about these things. Right.) Also, in order to not get assaulted or raped I need to dress a certain way. I should not provoke him. Because, then it’s my fault. HELL NO! I shouldn’t have to do these things, to feel safe at night. A societal stereotype says, “It’s the victim’s fault for getting drunk and getting raped!” Why? Just why do I have to do this and not men? I don’t think this is fair to me and my peers.

Women should especially not have to conform or give up certain ways of dressing, or acting, to feel like we will not be raped or assaulted. It gets me angry that almost all of men don’t have to do this to feel safe. They do what they want. They act how they want. Because, society says that they are the dominant gender.

Continue reading “Sexual Assualt”

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Gender inclusive housing

By Kali Nelson

A brick building meant for students to live at on a college campus.
A side photo of dorms building on a college campus.

When you think about it, housing options are a small thing in the larger scheme of going to college. In between filling out my FAFSA for the first headache inducing time to finding a decent packing list that didn’t cost upwards of $100, I didn’t think about where I would live. I knew for sure it would be on campus because freshmen are required to live on campus at the University of Idaho, and I went in knowing no one, so off campus wasn’t an option.

But as a straight cis-identifying woman, I didn’t think about if I would be comfortable with my new roommate, because I knew it would be another female like myself. Continue reading “Gender inclusive housing”

It’s Hard: How to Deal with Anxiety

Womxn in a ponytail meditating in a field with the sun shinning behind her.
There are many preventative measures for people who struggle with anxiety.

By Rosemary Anderson

Red light. You’re dying. You must be dying. You never thought you’d die in a Volkswagen.

Green light. Your heart beats uncontrollably. So loudly you can hear it over Katy Perry on the radio. Your chest throbs as if she also hit you in the torso with a baseball bat.

Left turn. Your legs and arms go numb, making it hard to grip the wheel. You start singing every church song you can remember from Sunday school.

Red light. You can’t see. You check your phone to call 911 but you can’t see the numbers. Everything is blurry–the lights, the cars, your mind. You’re on the verge of passing out.

Left turn. Breathing becomes painful. You take a breath as if your car is floating under water, your mind floating somewhere above your car.  

Red light. Your body begins to shake uncontrollably. You see a police car at the next intersection. You begin to formulate a plan to flag him down and tell him you’re dying. But you don’t know how to do this, so you keep driving home.

Continue reading “It’s Hard: How to Deal with Anxiety”

My Old Pals, Ana & Mia.

National Eating Disorder Awareness week, NEDA for short, was from February 26th to March 4th, and aimed to spotlight eating disorders and provide life-saving resources to those who need it. It’s time to talk about eating disorders and the many gripping holds it has on people’s lives.

From excessively counting calories or straight up purging yourself, eating disorders are terrifying and quickly overwhelm your life. Health should come from within.
Continue reading “My Old Pals, Ana & Mia.”

Dispelling the “Crazy Girl” Myth

8472524125_c9f6cb3431_zAccording to the World Health Organization, mental health is defined as “a state of well- being in which every individual realizes his or her own potential, can cope with the normal stresses of life, can work productively and fruitfully, and is able to make a contribution to her or his community.” Sounds like a daunting task to me. In our society, being a woman carries a full set of expectations. Looking a certain way, acting appropriately, being in a healthy relationship, having plans for the future, and taking on whatever else the world has to offer us that day, with a smile. For me, trying to live up to these unrealistic standards is impossible and not something I’m interested in. I am rarely realizing my full potential, coping with stress, working fruitfully, and contributing to society all at once. But feeling like that is still my responsibility as a member of society is a heavy burden to carry. I believe mental health is all too commonly ignored as the most important aspect of our overall well-being, especially as women. Continue reading “Dispelling the “Crazy Girl” Myth”

We Need Insurance Coverage for Eating Disorder Treatment

Warning: The following post may contain triggering material.

By Shanda Glover

I remember my older sister telling our dad the news. Tears were streaming down her face and her voice shook uncontrollably. She whispered “Alex is starving herself.” Within one month, my niece, an extraordinary ballerina, lost 21 pounds.

At only fourteen years old, my niece was diagnosed with an eating disorder.

As of 2015, 30 million people of all ages and genders suffer from an eating disorder, including anorexia, bulimia, and binge eating disorder, in the United States.

A sad picture of a sad girl. Her eyes are closed because she is sad.Since losing her daughter in 2000, Kitty Westin has been advocating for a federal bill to help prevent other deaths from eating disorders. This federal bill, The Anna Westin Act, was introduced to Congress in 2015. It is currently in a House subcommittee. Westin’s bill would accomplish three things: train health professionals on how to appropriately identify eating disorders, make insurance companies cover eating disorders in the same manner as other mental health disorders, and finally require a federal study into whether or not the government should regulate the photoshopped images used in today’s advertisements. Continue reading “We Need Insurance Coverage for Eating Disorder Treatment”

Book Review: Brain on Fire

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By Jessica Bovee

Imagine losing your mind. Your brain fails you and you can’t properly function in the society you have been raised in. You lose your identity. Susannah Cahalan experienced just this, and lost her sanity for a month. She began falling behind at work, experiencing seizures, inappropriate behavior, and far more that all culminated into a blackout of hospitals and scrutiny.

Mental Illness is an obvious concern in this book, but her book, Brain on Fire, deepens our insight on issues such as the national focus on medication for illnesses, while bringing us in on the personal stress surrounding figuring out a diagnosis. Cahalan, although diagnosed bi-polar as well as schizophrenic during her journey, was actually finally cured of anti-NMDA receptor encephalitis. This autoimmune disease left her life and mind in ruins, but her bestselling story leaves us amazed, yet still perturbed with the medical system in America.

Continue reading “Book Review: Brain on Fire”