Remember more than one month a year

By Kali Nelson

As Thanksgiving has come and passed, we are left with little of November left and with Donald Trump popping up at a Navajo veterans event at the White House on Monday to talk about Pocahontas, who was in fact not Navajo.

But today, in honor of Native American Heritage month coming to a close, I want to talk about Native American environmental groups. There are two in particular that I am going to highlight, though there are actually several of them. While they are not directly feminist, it is my belief that feminism and environmentalism are linked and I am using the platform I have to share information about a topic I see little coverage of.  Environmentalism and feminism can be linked in the way they are used to help further each other’s campaigns. One example is Honor the Earth, they had a campaign a few years ago to fight sexual assault of native women. They fought this by fighting the man camps that pop up around new oil drill sights. Continue reading “Remember more than one month a year”

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What is Vegetarian Ecofeminism?

Fresh vegetables line the aisle of a grocery store.
A aisle in the grocery store of fresh vegetables.

By Kali Nelson

Ecofeminism is a topic near and dear to my heart. It is not well known in most circles, but there is an even less known branch of ecofeminism called vegetarian ecofeminism.

A quick refresher on ecofeminism is the idea that the oppression of women and the oppression of nature are connected. I’ve discussed this topic before on this blog, and today I want to discuss a smaller branch of the ecofeminist movement. Continue reading “What is Vegetarian Ecofeminism?”

Even Now, Black Lives Matter

Black women march holding a sign reading "#blacklivesmatter."
Leaders of the Black Lives Matter movement march following the police shootings of innocent black men.

By Rosemary Anderson

Like most Americans, the Black Lives Matter movement was introduced to me through social media. My Instagram and Facebook feeds were flooded with images, videos, and hashtags condemning the unjust shootings of innocent black men and women by law enforcement. I was onboard with its message immediately. However, the movement also left some people confused and alienated. For some, its online presence was overwhelming and not something they wanted to affiliate themselves with.

So what really is “Black Lives Matter” and how did it start? For those who are afraid to ask, I might have some answers.

Continue reading “Even Now, Black Lives Matter”

Music: It’s Queer AF

Madonna kissing her ex-girlfriend Sandra Bernhard.

 

By Rosemary Anderson

So I have to be honest. I have a severe addiction to Instagram. It’s bad. I check Instagram at night before I go to bed, during my walk between classes, while I put on eyeliner before work, when my mom is talking to me about finances — the list literally never ends.

While trying to calculate exactly how many hours a day I spend in Instagram’s clutches, I stumbled upon a picture that almost made me cry. (Sad, right?) Kehlani, a pop singer and dancer, posted a picture with her girlfriend.

Wait a second. Girlfriend?! I had to blink a couple of times. Okay woah, I had no idea Kehlani was bisexual. I had been listening to her music for the last five years and didn’t know she was just like me. An openly queer woman, unafraid to show her love on a public platform.

I got curious. How many musicians we listen to on the radio everyday are bisexual? How many live openly and are unafraid to share their stories with the world’s eyes on them?

Continue reading “Music: It’s Queer AF”

The Women of the Alt-Right

A previously posted open-sourced photograph of Lana Lokteff was removed because she did not consent to her image being published in association with this article.

By Rosemary Anderson

The American alt-right movement wants to strip women of the right to vote, allow men to use violent tactics to “keep women in line,” and force women back into the home–but alt-right men are not the only ones who support these statements. Women do too.

With the rise of the alt-right, increasingly more women have become involved in the movement.

Racism, sexism, transphobia, homophobia, anti-Semitism, antifeminism: all are words that can describe the alt-right. So how do people get involved in the first place? Specifically, how do women get involved?

Continue reading “The Women of the Alt-Right”

Questionable Facts: Breast cancer edition

By Kali Nelson

 

A pink ribbon that folds on itself
The pink ribbon of breast cancer awareness.

One more post about breast cancer and I swear I am done until next October. Today I wrap up all that we have covered with some common questionable facts about breast cancer that may or may not be true. These questionable facts are going to come from breastcancer.org. I will go over a few that I think need a little extra attention but there are more. Please talk to a medical professional for more information if you have questions, and know that I am not a professional and I could very well be wrong and at the end of the day it is your body to run how you want.

1: Breast cancer runs in families.

Now this is not entirely false, John Hopkins says that it can run in families but that does not mean that it will. Anywhere from 5 to 10 percent of breast cancers run in families. So, while a family member may have breast cancer, that fact alone does not mean that you will for sure get it. Most breast cancers are not inherited but come about from a change in genes due to age or environmental factors. Continue reading “Questionable Facts: Breast cancer edition”

How to make the UI more inclusive

A diverse group of UI students pose in front of the Admin Building.
UI students pose in front of the Admin Building.

By Rosemary Anderson 

For me and many others, receiving an education from the University of Idaho is one of the best gifts we’ve ever been given. The campus is beautiful, the faculty and staff are welcoming, and the student body is diverse–or is it?

According to the numbers, 71% of students are white and only 29% of students are people of color. For a national average, 58% of all college students in America are white and the remaining 42% are people of color. From the 1970s to today, these percentages have been shifting more towards middle ground.

Although the diversity numbers for the UI may be a little higher than other universities, it’s not something to be proud of, at least not yet.

After talking to a few professors on campus, I learned that the faculty at the UI is disparagingly white as well. I was told that there are only about two dozen faculty of color. So how can we make our classrooms more inclusive?

Continue reading “How to make the UI more inclusive”