Choosing Not to Report

By Makayla Sundquist

Trigger Warning: This post discusses multiple survivors’ sexual assault experiences and may be triggering for others who have also experienced sexual assault. 

A woman holds a sign that depicts the words "#MeToo"
The #MeToo movement created more awareness about the presence of sexual assault. Photo from

If you have been keeping up with the University of Idaho news lately, you will notice the attention a 2013 sexual assault case is getting. The Idaho Statesman recently discovered a survivor’s testimony on a blog site, and ran a story that covered the investigation. (Read here). Long story short, the survivors did not receive the help from the athletic department they needed. Both people involved were athletes at UI, but the athletic department only protected the assaulter. The survivors then went to the Women’s Center, and the staff there took the case to the Dean of Students for an investigation. The assaulter was no longer allowed to play football at UI. However,  he is now playing for a team in New York (which I do not agree with, but that is a conversation for another day).

Throughout all of this buzz, I have heard some comments questioning why the survivor did not go directly to the Dean of Students. Some of these comments were in poor taste. Others were genuinely curious. Even though the two women who were sexually assaulted at UI chose to report their assault to the police and the athletic department, it is common for survivors to never report. But why?

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Gender and Role Play in Kids

Colorful graphic of androgynous figures illustrating different genders
Graphic illustrating different genders

By Beatrice Santiago 

Do you remember when you were 9 years old?

I vaguely remember what I was doing at that age. And I remember experiences in which I felt inferior to men, thinking as a young girl that I was not capable of certain tasks just because I was a girl. Society’s ideals can be cruel. Especially when you are told that if you do something a man does, you are not “acting like a lady.”

I recently read an article, “I AM 9 YEARS OLD: Children Across the World Tell Us How Gender Affects Their Lives.”  As the title implies, children were asked questions like:

“What is the best thing about being a girl?”

“What is the worst thing about being a girl?”

“How might your life be different if you were a boy (or a boy instead of a girl)?”

Their responses were shocking. However, they were answers I was expecting. Although many were positive, some were really sad to read. These children were interviewed from all different parts of the world by National Geographic.

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Vandal Family Values

University of Idaho mascot Joe Vandal marching with the marching band behind him.
University of Idaho mascot, Joe Vandal, and the marching band

By Brianna Love

When I was a prospective student for the University of Idaho, I was told that U of I was safe. I was told that this is a great school because we are “one big family.” On the web site it says,

“UI is committed to creating a safe environment for the UI community and those who visit.”

I thought that the university cared about me as one of their students. I thought that I was seen for who I am–not just as a dollar sign. So, in my pre-college mind, if I were to be harmed in any way as one of their students, I assumed the U of I would be there for me.

When incoming freshman start their journey at U of I, they are essentially moving to a new home. They become part of the “Vandal Family.” (At least that is how they feel.) It’s exactly how I felt. U of I was my new home. The Vandals were my family. I would never expect one of them to intentionally hurt me, and if they did, I expected the university to handle it properly…

If we are a family, why wouldn’t you want to protect and stand up for every member?

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Sex, Drugs, and Spring Break

A crowded beach in Mexico where there is no visible sand there are so many people
A crowded beach in Mexico, a popular spring break destination

By Chloe Rigg

Just a little pinprick
There’ll be no more, ah
But you may feel a little sick…

There is no pain you are receding
A distant ship, smoke on the horizon
You are only coming through in waves
Your lips move but I can’t hear what you’re saying


Pink Floyd’s famous song “Comfortably Numb” is either psychedelic, groovy, and melodic. Or, it is the “devils music” encouraging drug use {depending on who you talk to}. These lyrics are a perfect example of the 70’s “sex, drugs, and rock n’ roll” scene. This trend has been carried into 2018. Though it’s now more sex, drugs, and hip-hop. Spring break is seen as an iconic event in college culture, and it is where the sex, drugs, and hip-hop scene is most influential on students.

But, is this spring break culture inherent in every college student, or is the way we were taught {rather lack of teaching} about topics like sex and drugs what leads us to this dangerous partying?

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Drinking & Safety on Spring Break

Image of a group of students in swim suits on a spring break trip at the beach.
Spring Breakers

By Brianna Love

With University of Idaho’s Spring Break just a week away, it seems fitting to address the activities and dangers that come with it. Binge drinking, embarrassment, sexual assault, kidnapping, trafficking, and various other dangers are always lurking in the corner.

A stereotypical, college spring break could either be the best or the worst time of your life. The primary contributor to students regretting their spring break is binge drinking.

What exactly is binge drinking?

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Pro Planned Parenthood

By Makayla Sundquist

Let’s talk about Planned Parenthood.

“Abortion Clinic!” you scream.

“Murderers!” you cry.

“They sell fetal tissue!” you claim.

(That last one has been proven false, read here).

Sign reading "I stand with Planned Parenthood" on a pink background
Common signed used to support Planned Parenthood.

There are many myths about Planned Parenthood, and there are people who believe their clinics should not be established because they perform abortions. Before we continue, abortion is legal in the United States. It has been since the 1973 Roe v. Wade case. Planned Parenthood provides women with legal abortions. Do you want women to die from coat hanger abortions? No? Neither do I, let’s move on. Some of the clinics only provide a medication abortion, a pill taken up to 10 weeks that blocks progesterone and causes the fetus to detach from the uterine wall, but other clinics provide surgical abortions. In case you were wondering, the Planned Parenthood in Pullman only provides a medication abortion. However, abortions are only a small piece of the services that Planned Parenthood provides. The most common reason people access Planned Parenthood is to receive STI testing/treatment. 

What makes Planned Parenthood so amazing is that it provides a wide variety of health-related services, and not all of them are related to sexual health. Fun Fact: you can go receive a sports physical at the Planned Parenthood in Pullman, WA. Then again, if you do need some “down there” assistance, Planned Parenthood is a fantastic resource. They provide STI tests, pap smears, pregnancy tests, UTI treatment, and even vasectomies. That’s right, men, Planned Parenthood can be your health center as well! And it is starting to be. In 2014, PP clinics served 250,000 men, which is a 76% increase from a decade ago. The Pullman Planned Parenthood helps men with erectile dysfunction, male infertility, premature ejaculation, and routine physicals. Other Planned Parenthood Clinics can screen men for testicular and prostate cancer.

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Not So Pretty In PINK

PINK Bus stairs reading, Pink Campus Tour 2016. Your School. Your Pink. #pinkbus. Follow vspink on snapchat and instagram

By Chloe Rigg

Clothing has been an ever-changing part of society–practically changing with every generation. Some styles have been more bizarre then others, “‘Many [a woman] makes two breastbags [bags for the breasts], with them she roams the streets, so that all the young men that look at her, can see her beautiful breasts; But whose breasts are too large, makes tight pouches, so there is no gossip in the city about her big breasts.’” Though it might sound like a medieval rap lyric, this quote is from a 15th century satirical piece about women’s “bras” at the time. Though having vast knowledge on 15th century clothing might be a cool icebreaker, you don’t have to look far back into history to see how lingerie companies have affected women’s body image and self-esteem.

Earlier in the week, another Women’s Center blogger took a deeper look into why the PINK bus on campus was a good thing, and it doesn’t make you a bad feminist to support it. Because every argument has two {or multiple} sides, I will be discussing the negative aspects of the campus PINK bus.

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