#PINKBus & Feminism

A side-angle image of a pink tour bus with white polka dots that says
Victoria’s Secret PINK Tour Bus

By: Brianna Love

On Thursday, Feb. 18, the Victoria’s Secret PINK Tour Bus stopped by at the University of Idaho campus. The bus brought with it a lot of controversy. Should this be allowed on university campuses?

Well, why shouldn’t it be allowed on campuses? This great marketing strategy for the PINK brand allows students to shop brand new products on their own campus. For students at the University of Idaho, this is a treat because there is no local PINK store.

Does this go against what feminism stands for?

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Engineering at the University of Idaho: A Gender Gap

Picture of young woman working on engineering homework that includes finding the force necessary to move two circuits.
Makynzie Zimmer works on her machine component design homework between classes.

By Makayla Sundquist

It is not surprising that the University of Idaho has more men in engineering compared to women, in fact nearly every undergraduate university has more males in their engineering programs compared to females. However, the University of Idaho is slightly above the national average for male dominance in engineering programs; currently, the national average is 81% of all engineering programs are comprised of males; compared to the University of Idaho which has 86%. Even though the number of women in STEM fields are increasing, men still outnumber women quite substantially.

It makes sense really. Children are placed into gender roles from the moment they are born. Take a walk down any toy store and you will see boy’s toys encouraging building and exploring, while girl’s toys encourage communication and imagination. Growing up, little girls learn that they are supposed to be caretakers. Playing dolls and house and using Easy Bake ovens create the sense that women belong in professions that have an emphasis in caretaking. This is why most women choose degrees in the helping professions or education. And I am not saying that being a woman in education is negative. I have many female friends pursuing education and I know that they will best amazing teachers, and change the lives of their students. However, I also know many men who would have been amazing teachers, and many women who would have been successful engineers. I think it is important to open up traditional gender roles and allow those expectations to be more fluid across genders.

Continue reading “Engineering at the University of Idaho: A Gender Gap”

Latina Women take the Lead!

Beatrice is working on the computer on a project.
A photo of Beatrice working on the computer.

By Beatrice Santiago 

“What would you like to do when you grow up, mija?’’ asked my mom. This is a question that am I sure most of us were asked at some point in our lives. As a young Latina woman, this question always lingered in the back of my mind. Because I had an idea where I wanted to go. I wanted to go to college and get into a career of my choice. Currently, I am in college and my career is still in the works. I knew that when I would tell adults that I wanted to become a movie director, even an actress, but first receive an education. They would support me, yet I knew that they probably thought I could never make it. Who would take a high school student seriously with those types of dreams?  Little did they know. After my parents realized that I was actually being serious about going to college, that it was truly something I wanted to do, they supported me in every possible way. Now they are my biggest supporters.

Yet many families still have the mentality that women should take care of the house and the children while men go out and work to provide for them. Those type of expectations are especially put on Latina women. My family would always tell me that if I didn’t go to college, then I would be expected to find a man that could provide for me because I wouldn’t go far in life without a man next to my side. Or that I would get pregnant and regret it later on. This made me begin to create negative thoughts in my head–I wasn’t good enough. Or I’m not college material, I’m not capable of finishing college and finding my dream job. There were times where I got so upset, even when I did come to college. But, then I would remember stories about Sonia Sotomayor becoming the first Latina in the Supreme Court, or Gina Rodriguez winning a Golden Globe award for Best Actress in Jane the Virgin.  Continue reading “Latina Women take the Lead!”

The Hunting Ground: Sexual Assault on College Campuses

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Picture Credit: The Hunting Ground documentary showing college students’ march outside UNC against sexual assault

By Samragyee Gautam.

When I first heard about a documentary called “Hunting Ground”, my mind assumed it was some sci-fi story. But it had nothing to do with fantasy or any interesting stories. It is the real and sad truth about sexual assault in college and how, despite being such major problem, universities choose not to take this matter seriously.

The showing of this documentary, organized by Generation Action; a club on campus that advocates for sexual health rights, and sponsored by Dean of Students of University of Idaho, took place this Tuesday on November 07 at the Whitewater Room, Commons. As an active member of the club and a supporter of sex education, I thought it was a powerful and important event. We had a good number of people participate. The one and half hour showing of the documentary was followed by some questions from the audience members to the panelists who covered the topics of the sexual assault rate and reporting on college campuses. Continue reading “The Hunting Ground: Sexual Assault on College Campuses”

How to make the UI more inclusive

A diverse group of UI students pose in front of the Admin Building.
UI students pose in front of the Admin Building.

By Rosemary Anderson 

For me and many others, receiving an education from the University of Idaho is one of the best gifts we’ve ever been given. The campus is beautiful, the faculty and staff are welcoming, and the student body is diverse–or is it?

According to the numbers, 71% of students are white and only 29% of students are people of color. For a national average, 58% of all college students in America are white and the remaining 42% are people of color. From the 1970s to today, these percentages have been shifting more towards middle ground.

Although the diversity numbers for the UI may be a little higher than other universities, it’s not something to be proud of, at least not yet.

After talking to a few professors on campus, I learned that the faculty at the UI is disparagingly white as well. I was told that there are only about two dozen faculty of color. So how can we make our classrooms more inclusive?

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Male Circumcision in the United States and Consent

For the past two weeks I’ve talked about consent in the context of sex and how consent relates to individuals who are intersex. This week I want to broaden the discussion on a child’s right to decide what happens to their body through an exploration on circumcision.

During the Victorian Era, circumcision became a widespread practice as a treatment for masturbation. At this time, it was the belief of many doctors that masturbation led to many diseases, and that by removing one of the most sensitive parts of the penis, it could be prevented. Male circumcision was not just prevalent in the United States, but in all English-speaking countries at the time, such as Great Britain, Australia, and New Zealand. However, the practice decreased significantly in all of those countries except the United States in the following years. Now, between 60 to 90% of American boys are circumcised, depending on the region they live in, but only 16% of boys in Great Britain are circumcised, even though both countries were influenced by the ideas in the Victorian Era. So why is the United States still engaging in this practice? Continue reading “Male Circumcision in the United States and Consent”

The (Not So Honorable) Honor Code

Universities should have the right to implement their own forms of rules, guidelines, and punishments. If it is a religious-based school then they should have the opportunity to operate under religious constitutions and freedoms. If students sign this contract or attend this university, than they are aware of what they are agreeing to. Seems pretty straightforward and reasonable, right?
Well, unfortunately, this honor code can cause a mess of problems when it comes to unforeseen “consequences” of breaking this honor code. Although I am sure there are many such consequences of this, the one that’s causing the most headlines is rape.

Brigham Young University is currently under fire for its honor code and its lack of 572a8a74091d3.imageintervention for rape victims. Multiple students have come forward saying that when they went to the school about rape allegations, they were threatened with suspension or expulsion for violating the honor code.  Sophomore Madi Barny, who ended up drafting a petition to protest the honor code at Brigham Young University, is one of these many victims. One of her arguments is that the logic of the honor code says that if a victim hadn’t been drinking, hadn’t been in a male’s dorm room, or hadn’t been engaging in other sexual activities, perhaps the rape wouldn’t have occurred. Needless to say, I was horrified when I heard about these cases.
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