Want a Dose of Cognitive Dissonance?

Stacked white papers with big black question marks on them.
Question Marks

By Brianna Love

When an 8-month-old baby girl is raped in India, women across the United States took a stance on Twitter to spread the word that this is not okay. The reaction some men had on Twitter was not pleasing at all. From death threats to just plain calling the women sexist, why does spreading the word of such a tragedy hit a nerve with men?

Swati Jai Hind, Twitter username: @SwatiJaiHind, tweeted about the baby on January 29 at 9:09 a.m. Her tweet said, “The worst has happened. An 8 month old baby has been brutally raped in the Capital and is battling for her life in a Hospital. Going to the hospital to meet her. Am totally numb. Terrified to face her. Please please pray for her.” By 10:50 a.m. Nivesh Agarwal replied with “Is this tweet a concern or a stunt .. Why do we write all these things on Social Media to gain sympathy or voters support.”
Continue reading “Want a Dose of Cognitive Dissonance?”

Advertisements

A Symptom of Misogyny

A sign that reads "Grab 'em by the patriarchy" with women's hands grabbing the sign
Grab ’em by the patriarchy

By Sierra Rothermich

Cat-calling, objectifying, sexually harassing, rape. According to the Pew Research Center, two-thirds of Americans say recent reports of sexual harassment and assault are more reflective of widespread problems in society rather than acts of individual misconduct. Because violating women’s rights is a social norm, globally, violence against women is a detrimental public health issue.

 The World Health Organization reported that one in three women worldwide have experienced either physical and/or sexual intimate partner violence or non-partner sexual violence in their life. According to the World Health Organization, men are more likely to perpetrate violence if they have low education, a history of child maltreatment, exposure to domestic violence against their mothers, harmful use of alcohol, unequal gender norms including attitudes accepting of violence and a sense of entitlement over women. This provides evidence that men are taught to be violent against women due to a society that deems misogyny as socially acceptable. Continue reading “A Symptom of Misogyny”

Remember more than one month a year

By Kali Nelson

As Thanksgiving has come and passed, we are left with little of November left and with Donald Trump popping up at a Navajo veterans event at the White House on Monday to talk about Pocahontas, who was in fact not Navajo.

But today, in honor of Native American Heritage month coming to a close, I want to talk about Native American environmental groups. There are two in particular that I am going to highlight, though there are actually several of them. While they are not directly feminist, it is my belief that feminism and environmentalism are linked and I am using the platform I have to share information about a topic I see little coverage of.  Environmentalism and feminism can be linked in the way they are used to help further each other’s campaigns. One example is Honor the Earth, they had a campaign a few years ago to fight sexual assault of native women. They fought this by fighting the man camps that pop up around new oil drill sights. Continue reading “Remember more than one month a year”

The Hunting Ground: Sexual Assault on College Campuses

1
Picture Credit: The Hunting Ground documentary showing college students’ march outside UNC against sexual assault

By Samragyee Gautam.

When I first heard about a documentary called “Hunting Ground”, my mind assumed it was some sci-fi story. But it had nothing to do with fantasy or any interesting stories. It is the real and sad truth about sexual assault in college and how, despite being such major problem, universities choose not to take this matter seriously.

The showing of this documentary, organized by Generation Action; a club on campus that advocates for sexual health rights, and sponsored by Dean of Students of University of Idaho, took place this Tuesday on November 07 at the Whitewater Room, Commons. As an active member of the club and a supporter of sex education, I thought it was a powerful and important event. We had a good number of people participate. The one and half hour showing of the documentary was followed by some questions from the audience members to the panelists who covered the topics of the sexual assault rate and reporting on college campuses. Continue reading “The Hunting Ground: Sexual Assault on College Campuses”

Behind The Fields: The Importance of the Bandana Project

 

 

bandana-project
A woman wearing a bandana while working on barbed wire. A title that says, “The Bandana Project”.

 

By Valeria Ramirez

Farmworkers Awareness Week is this week and is currently taking place in our UI campus and other campuses around the United States. This week is to inform other about the dangers and sacrifices that farmworkers have endured. Especially informing the public about the Bandana Project. The main issue that the Bandana Project is handling today is about women who work in the fields and spending hours in the blistering sun picking whatever is in season. As a woman working in the fields, there are many dangers that can occur from dealing with harsh temperatures, underpaid dangerous work, and sadly, they encounter many forms of sexual abuse.

Sexual abuse amongst the farmworker industry is surprisingly common and it’s heartbreaking to hear that many women undergo this treatment. They work day in and day out, doing whatever it takes to feed their families, pay their bills, and support themselves. The working conditions are horrendous and many work for 8 hours non-stop, no breaks or time to rest. Many abusers prey on these women knowing that they can’t do anything to stop them. Some of these abusers work in the fields with them or are supervisors themselves. The supervisors believe that they have some entitlement over these women, which makes them certain that they can get away with whatever they want. Sadly, they hold their power over these women because they know that some migrated illegally or they will be automatically fired if they don’t do whatever they say. This prohibits women from speaking out and taking action because their afraid to lose their job and income. No one should be treated in this manner or should be blackmailed for sexual favors.

Continue reading “Behind The Fields: The Importance of the Bandana Project”

Fighting the Bystander Effect

By Jolie Day

bystander
“Stand. Speak. Act.”

Have you ever seen a person in need of help but thought someone else would eventually step in? What about someone being verbally or physically assaulted because of their race, identity, religion, or gender—and no one tried to help them? Witnessed someone who was visibly intoxicated with no one to be sure they were getting home safely? Have you yourself been in a situation and needed help, but no one seemed to want to get involved? All of these experiences illustrate what is known as the bystander effect.

According to Psychology Today, the bystander effect is a sociological phenomenon that occurs when the presence of others discourages anyone from providing assistance to someone in danger, as there is a perceived diffusion of responsibility amongst them. Devastatingly, this effect can be deadly. With the dangerous uptick in violence since the election, 1 in 4 women and 1 in 33 men on average being sexually assaulted in their lifetime, and nearly 20 people per minute being abused by an intimate partner, it is important to understand what we can do to combat the bystander effect and keep people safe. Continue reading “Fighting the Bystander Effect”

We Need To Address Toxic Masculinity

By Jolie Day

toxic-masculinity
Actor Michael John Madden in “American Male”

In “American Male,” a short film written and directed by Michael Rohrbaugh, a persona is created: an American male college student who is tough, fit, aggressive, and definitely not effeminate. The short film applies a narrative of the different expectations our society has for men and women. This young man is struggling to come to terms with his identity and sexuality within the narrow confines that society provides. The context of this short film is an important discussion, as forms of toxic masculinity arise and have lasting effects for men and societal ramifications for everyone.

Continue reading “We Need To Address Toxic Masculinity”