Sexual Assualt

 

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Screenshot of SOS on iPhone

By Beatrice Santiago 

 

Sexual Assault is real, people, and unfortunately, it happens everywhere. Including here.

As a college student, I walk to campus all the time. (Even at times where it can be very scary.) I can’t even tell you the times I have checked my surroundings, over and over again while going home, after a late night at the library. From wanting to listen to my music as I walk, but having to put only one headphone in, just in case. From taking classes to learn how to defend myself, because women, unfortunately, get put in danger more than men do. I must take an extra step and extra precautions, just because I am a woman. I always try to look for resources that can help me if a predator decided to attack me by surprise.

Not long ago, my sister told me a capability I was not aware of. On Iphones, you click the power button five times in a row and the image above will pop up. By sliding the SOS button on your IPhone, this will send your location to the nearest police station. I also have learned how to carry my keys between my thumbs. I even learned about a bra with a sensor in it that can alert the police if your heart rate is too high over a long period of time. (Signaling the police.) I must do this and many more things to feel safe. Even the way I act and dress. I always have to have an extra layer of protection before I can go outside because I am not sure what could happen. I should not have to live like this!! All women should have the ability to do whatever they desire.

My question is: Why do I find myself needing to do this? (Right, because I am a woman and because men don’t have to worry about these things. Right.) Also, in order to not get assaulted or raped I need to dress a certain way. I should not provoke him. Because, then it’s my fault. HELL NO! I shouldn’t have to do these things, to feel safe at night. A societal stereotype says, “It’s the victim’s fault for getting drunk and getting raped!” Why? Just why do I have to do this and not men? I don’t think this is fair to me and my peers.

Women should especially not have to conform or give up certain ways of dressing, or acting, to feel like we will not be raped or assaulted. It gets me angry that almost all of men don’t have to do this to feel safe. They do what they want. They act how they want. Because, society says that they are the dominant gender.

Continue reading “Sexual Assualt”

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Truth is Power

Women's rights activist Tarana Burke wearing a "Me too" shirt
Activist Tarana Burke

By Sierra Rothermich

“I don’t watch the news, it’s all negative.” Comments like these are said every day to justify society’s apathetic attitude towards the press. But if everything on the news is negative, shouldn’t that spark our passion for combating these horrifying issues? Why would we choose to neglect the social injustice we see in media? We cannot afford to be ignorant of what’s going on in the world.

According to Sasa Vucinic’s TedTalk, 83-percent of the population on this planet lives in societies without independent press. This means 83-percent of the world doesn’t truly know what’s going on in their countries. These people are deprived of knowing their own reality. In the United States, the press and media give us the power to tell the truth. Continue reading “Truth is Power”

Want a Dose of Cognitive Dissonance?

Stacked white papers with big black question marks on them.
Question Marks

By Brianna Love

When an 8-month-old baby girl is raped in India, women across the United States took a stance on Twitter to spread the word that this is not okay. The reaction some men had on Twitter was not pleasing at all. From death threats to just plain calling the women sexist, why does spreading the word of such a tragedy hit a nerve with men?

Swati Jai Hind, Twitter username: @SwatiJaiHind, tweeted about the baby on January 29 at 9:09 a.m. Her tweet said, “The worst has happened. An 8 month old baby has been brutally raped in the Capital and is battling for her life in a Hospital. Going to the hospital to meet her. Am totally numb. Terrified to face her. Please please pray for her.” By 10:50 a.m. Nivesh Agarwal replied with “Is this tweet a concern or a stunt .. Why do we write all these things on Social Media to gain sympathy or voters support.”
Continue reading “Want a Dose of Cognitive Dissonance?”

A Symptom of Misogyny

A sign that reads "Grab 'em by the patriarchy" with women's hands grabbing the sign
Grab ’em by the patriarchy

By Sierra Rothermich

Cat-calling, objectifying, sexually harassing, rape. According to the Pew Research Center, two-thirds of Americans say recent reports of sexual harassment and assault are more reflective of widespread problems in society rather than acts of individual misconduct. Because violating women’s rights is a social norm, globally, violence against women is a detrimental public health issue.

 The World Health Organization reported that one in three women worldwide have experienced either physical and/or sexual intimate partner violence or non-partner sexual violence in their life. According to the World Health Organization, men are more likely to perpetrate violence if they have low education, a history of child maltreatment, exposure to domestic violence against their mothers, harmful use of alcohol, unequal gender norms including attitudes accepting of violence and a sense of entitlement over women. This provides evidence that men are taught to be violent against women due to a society that deems misogyny as socially acceptable. Continue reading “A Symptom of Misogyny”

Remember more than one month a year

By Kali Nelson

As Thanksgiving has come and passed, we are left with little of November left and with Donald Trump popping up at a Navajo veterans event at the White House on Monday to talk about Pocahontas, who was in fact not Navajo.

But today, in honor of Native American Heritage month coming to a close, I want to talk about Native American environmental groups. There are two in particular that I am going to highlight, though there are actually several of them. While they are not directly feminist, it is my belief that feminism and environmentalism are linked and I am using the platform I have to share information about a topic I see little coverage of.  Environmentalism and feminism can be linked in the way they are used to help further each other’s campaigns. One example is Honor the Earth, they had a campaign a few years ago to fight sexual assault of native women. They fought this by fighting the man camps that pop up around new oil drill sights. Continue reading “Remember more than one month a year”

The Hunting Ground: Sexual Assault on College Campuses

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Picture Credit: The Hunting Ground documentary showing college students’ march outside UNC against sexual assault

By Samragyee Gautam.

When I first heard about a documentary called “Hunting Ground”, my mind assumed it was some sci-fi story. But it had nothing to do with fantasy or any interesting stories. It is the real and sad truth about sexual assault in college and how, despite being such major problem, universities choose not to take this matter seriously.

The showing of this documentary, organized by Generation Action; a club on campus that advocates for sexual health rights, and sponsored by Dean of Students of University of Idaho, took place this Tuesday on November 07 at the Whitewater Room, Commons. As an active member of the club and a supporter of sex education, I thought it was a powerful and important event. We had a good number of people participate. The one and half hour showing of the documentary was followed by some questions from the audience members to the panelists who covered the topics of the sexual assault rate and reporting on college campuses. Continue reading “The Hunting Ground: Sexual Assault on College Campuses”

Behind The Fields: The Importance of the Bandana Project

 

 

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A woman wearing a bandana while working on barbed wire. A title that says, “The Bandana Project”.

 

By Valeria Ramirez

Farmworkers Awareness Week is this week and is currently taking place in our UI campus and other campuses around the United States. This week is to inform other about the dangers and sacrifices that farmworkers have endured. Especially informing the public about the Bandana Project. The main issue that the Bandana Project is handling today is about women who work in the fields and spending hours in the blistering sun picking whatever is in season. As a woman working in the fields, there are many dangers that can occur from dealing with harsh temperatures, underpaid dangerous work, and sadly, they encounter many forms of sexual abuse.

Sexual abuse amongst the farmworker industry is surprisingly common and it’s heartbreaking to hear that many women undergo this treatment. They work day in and day out, doing whatever it takes to feed their families, pay their bills, and support themselves. The working conditions are horrendous and many work for 8 hours non-stop, no breaks or time to rest. Many abusers prey on these women knowing that they can’t do anything to stop them. Some of these abusers work in the fields with them or are supervisors themselves. The supervisors believe that they have some entitlement over these women, which makes them certain that they can get away with whatever they want. Sadly, they hold their power over these women because they know that some migrated illegally or they will be automatically fired if they don’t do whatever they say. This prohibits women from speaking out and taking action because their afraid to lose their job and income. No one should be treated in this manner or should be blackmailed for sexual favors.

Continue reading “Behind The Fields: The Importance of the Bandana Project”