Has it Gotten Any Better?

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Measuring tape on a womans waist

By Delaney Hopen

In America’s fashion industry,  the “plus-size” identity has always been a prominent component. This “size” range is considered sizes 8 and above, and isn’t carried in every store. From my perspective, I never noticed any sort of shaming or disrespect towards women that don’t weigh 100 pounds in the media, but of course how could I? I was only a young teen in the grocery stores looking at the covers, I couldn’t possibly notice all the praise of major weight losses that are just subtle conditioning set in our societies to convince us losing weight is a good thing.

Don’t get me wrong, adjusting your life in order to be a healthy you is a great thing. Me being an exercise freak, I think it feels amazing to set a body goal and achieve it but I’ve never been told I had to change like a lot of women have in the fashion world. There are all types of trends today in the beauty and health industry that I’m sure the older generations might not legitimately believe are popular because advancements in makeup, skinny teas and dieting techniques, and online weight loss plans have become so accessible.

Continue reading “Has it Gotten Any Better?”

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Engineering at the University of Idaho: A Gender Gap

Picture of young woman working on engineering homework that includes finding the force necessary to move two circuits.
Makynzie Zimmer works on her machine component design homework between classes.

By Makayla Sundquist

It is not surprising that the University of Idaho has more men in engineering compared to women, in fact nearly every undergraduate university has more males in their engineering programs compared to females. However, the University of Idaho is slightly above the national average for male dominance in engineering programs; currently, the national average is 81% of all engineering programs are comprised of males; compared to the University of Idaho which has 86%. Even though the number of women in STEM fields are increasing, men still outnumber women quite substantially.

It makes sense really. Children are placed into gender roles from the moment they are born. Take a walk down any toy store and you will see boy’s toys encouraging building and exploring, while girl’s toys encourage communication and imagination. Growing up, little girls learn that they are supposed to be caretakers. Playing dolls and house and using Easy Bake ovens create the sense that women belong in professions that have an emphasis in caretaking. This is why most women choose degrees in the helping professions or education. And I am not saying that being a woman in education is negative. I have many female friends pursuing education and I know that they will best amazing teachers, and change the lives of their students. However, I also know many men who would have been amazing teachers, and many women who would have been successful engineers. I think it is important to open up traditional gender roles and allow those expectations to be more fluid across genders.

Continue reading “Engineering at the University of Idaho: A Gender Gap”

Blast from the Past: an interview with a UI Alumni who worked at the Women’s Center

 

Photos of the Women's Center family. Photo Credit: Linda Mann
Photos of the UI Women’s Center family back in the 70’s. Photo Credit: Linda Mann

By Lindsey Heflin

“How do you feel about Lesbians and gay people?”

Linda Mann sat in her chair during the interview, across from the women who watched her quietly, patiently awaiting a response that could potentially make or break the interview.

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A Picture of the American Sex Worker

A diverse group of protests advocating for sex workers rights. Front group holding a sign that says “sex workers rights = human rights.” By Rosemary Anderson

As I write this article, I want to make it known that the sex industry is not always positive for women and girls. According to the U.S. National Library of Medicine, sex workers around the world have a 45 to 75 percent chance of experiencing violence during their careers.

When sex workers do experience violence, they are not protected by rape shield laws and are not eligible for compensation funds.

Many see sex workers as objects, non-human, and second-rate members of society. This makes sex workers even more prone to being victims of violence.

Women are forced into sex work without their consent, others are forced into sex work because of financial situations, and some choose sex work as their profession.

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A Mother-Daughter Bond like None Other

Sandi pic
Sandi’s daughter, Molly, posing for a picture with her 6 half-siblings at a reunion last summer, in Spirit Lake, ID. Photo Credit: Sandi Klingler

By Lindsey Heflin

Growing up, like most girls, Sandi Klingler envisioned herself getting married and having kids. It wasn’t until she was about 30 years old that Sandi began to realize that her fertility clock was ticking and while she had great relationships with great men, she hadn’t met the man she wanted to marry, nor have kids with.

That’s when she turned to an alternative method: artificial insemination.

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Friday Craftivism in University of Idaho.

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Picture Courtesy: WC Facebook Page

By Samragyee Gautam.

Have you all heard about Friday Crafternoon organized by Women Center (WC) every Friday on campus at UofI? During one of my Friday visits to the WC, I witnessed a bunch of students and some staff hanging out in the lounge area engaging in various crafts and painting activities. With some research I came to know about this unique weekly event, which is an amazing opportunity for all the students as well as faculty and staff on campus to meet new people as well as to learn and explore about art.

Iris Alatorre who is the office manager at WC, often leads these crafternoons. According to her, this program started last January with a goal to offer students some weekly space to hang out in the Women Center and help them get to know the staff as well as the services provided by the office. Because of the Women’s Center’s current location, the ground floor of Memorial Gym, not a lot of students are aware of this specific program or resource provided on campus to help and promote women equality. One of the services the Women’s Center provides is this free crafting activity every week. Anyone is welcome to come and do some crafting or just spend some time with friends every Friday anytime between 12pm to 2pm with the exception of Finals week. Continue reading “Friday Craftivism in University of Idaho.”

A Domestic Violence Survivor

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Picture Courtesy: Takomavoice Website

By Samragyee Gautam.

“That day I came back home only to get an energy drink poured down my face and being flicked in the head all the way to the back of the bathroom and he wouldn’t stop hitting me so I had to push him back and clawed his face because I had had enough of it.” Some of us know what I am going to talk about. Because recent data shows that on average, nearly 20 people per minute are physically abused by an intimate partner in the United States. During one year, this equates to more than 10 million women and men. So most of us must have encountered a story of domestic violence or unfortunately may have been a victim once in their life time.

Domestic violence is defined by the US Department of Justice, as a pattern of abusive behavior in any relationship that is used by one partner to gain or maintain power and control over another intimate partner. Domestic violence can be physical, sexual, emotional, economic, or psychological actions or threats of actions that influence another person. This includes any behaviors that intimidate, manipulate, humiliate, isolate, frighten, terrorize, coerce, threaten, blame, hurt, injure, or wound someone. Britne Worl is a survivor of emotional and physical domestic violence who is vocal about her story to raise awareness. Continue reading “A Domestic Violence Survivor”