Much Ado about Breasts

Pictured are the backs of two womxn, one without a bra and one with. The womxn not wearing the bra has "Free the Nipple" written across their back.
Womxn around the world have come together to support the “Free the Nipple” campaign which acts to destigmatize womxn’s breasts.

By Rosemary Anderson

“I appreciate that you don’t wear bras, but, just so you know, your boobs will get really saggy when you get older.”

Thanks mom.

Although we have come a long way since the bra-burning second wave of feminism she’s used to, breasts and feminism are still bosom buddies.

With the Free the Nipple movement gaining popularity, many womxn are acknowledging how absurd it is that the public can see the entirety of someone’s breast tissue, but oh god no! Not the nipple! How could you?! It’s just too much!

Everyone’s nipples look the same regardless of gender, but some people just haven’t latched on to that message. To combat the nipple discrimination, some businesses have created campaigns that sell T-shirts and swim tops that cover a womxn’s nipple with a man’s nipple. Some medical centers have even created informative breast cancer screening videos using a man’s breast as he stands in front of a womxn.

When a womxn’s breast is exposed on TV (Janet Jackson’s Superbowl scandal, anyone?), it is somehow more offensive to viewers than characters violently murdered on screen. This promotes the message that nipples are worse than crime. Nipples are crime.

Continue reading “Much Ado about Breasts”

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The Art of Passing

By Olivia Comstock

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A comic about the notion of passing
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Another comic about passing

Passing is about performance. Passing is about presentation. Passing is about appearance and external markers of identity. Because most of the world only knows each of us through how we look, and we never get to explain our inner nuances to them, then they only see us for what we are the outside. They make assumptions for what our outward selves signify for our inner selves. Our identity and beliefs are assumed from a quick glance. Usually people think of gender or race with the topic of passing, but passing can involve a huge range of personal characteristics, including race, ethnicity, gender, sex, sexuality, religion, disability or ability, job occupation, level of education, intelligence, economic class, and social status. Passing can signify any personal characteristic of identity.

Continue reading “The Art of Passing”