Good News!

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By Mary Emert

On Tuesday November 6th the nation held its midterm elections and the stakes, to some, have never been higher. And, in some places the results have never been better. A record number of women, people of color, and people from the LGBT+ community ran, and a record number of them won as well ushering in new faces to represent America.

Congress will have a record breaking 118 women, next year making up 22% of congress which is a significant jump from the 20% currently in office. Many of these women were inspired after the 2016 election, and many of them are democratic working towards women’s rights to birth control, safe abortion, and equal treatment in politics.

Two of these women, Sharice Davids and Deb Haaland, happen to be Native American both women are very involved in their tribes and interested in the rights of Native Women, who unknown to many have the highest missing and murdered percentages among any minority. Davids also identifies as a lesbian making her the first openly LGBT+ member of Congress from Kansas.

In this she is not alone either. Colorado Democratic Rep. Jared Polis, will be the first openly gay governor of Colorado. Chris Pappas will be New Hampshire’s first openly gay member of Congress. Lesbian Angie Craig defeats anti-LGBTQ congressman in Minnesota, will be first openly gay person elected to Congress from the state. Two transgender women, Gerri Cannon and Lisa Bunker, were elected to the New Hampshire House of Representatives. According to the Los Angeles Blade, Cannon and Bunker will join Virginia state Del. Danica Roem as the only openly trans members of any U.S. state legislature. Democrats Susan Ruiz and Brandon Woodard become the first LGBT+ members of Continue reading “Good News!”

Feminism and Islam

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by Jenna McDaniel

Those who persist in analyzing Feminism through a Western lens often consider the Muslim faith and feminist values incompatible. Much anti-feminist sentiment regarding Islam has focused unreasonably on the custom of veiling. The women of the Muslim faith have struggled for years with stereotypes around the veil, which in the eyes of outsiders signify oppression and subjugation to patriarchal regimes. Many non-Muslims who don’t understand the veil’s cultural and religious significance believe that wearing the veil oppresses women.

As Feminism seeks to expand its outreach and context globally, it should refrain from setting boundaries on who is or isn’t permitted to join the movement. Islam began over 1, 400 years ago and its deep roots begin with the faith’s foundational text, the Q’uran. The Q’uran emphasizes that women are fully human and equal to their male counterparts. Islamic feminism isn’t born from Muslim cultures; rather, it is a branch of feminism that syncs with Islamic theology with the Q’uran as its foundational core. Rachelle Fawcett, author of The Reality And Future Of Islamic Feminism, explains:

 “Often, women’s issues are trivialized into whether or not to wear the veil or shake hands with men outside their family, and while larger issues, such as domestic violence are being strongly addressed, the central issue of what “equality” means and how it is expressed go largely ignored. For example, domestic violence is wrong because it creates pain and suffering and is unjust, but the central belief of a man’s right to rule over his wife is not always part of the discussion.”

Continue reading “Feminism and Islam”