Latina Women take the Lead!

Beatrice is working on the computer on a project.
A photo of Beatrice working on the computer.

By Beatrice Santiago 

“What would you like to do when you grow up, mija?’’ asked my mom. This is a question that am I sure most of us were asked at some point in our lives. As a young Latina woman, this question always lingered in the back of my mind. Because I had an idea where I wanted to go. I wanted to go to college and get into a career of my choice. Currently, I am in college and my career is still in the works. I knew that when I would tell adults that I wanted to become a movie director, even an actress, but first receive an education. They would support me, yet I knew that they probably thought I could never make it. Who would take a high school student seriously with those types of dreams?  Little did they know. After my parents realized that I was actually being serious about going to college, that it was truly something I wanted to do, they supported me in every possible way. Now they are my biggest supporters.

Yet many families still have the mentality that women should take care of the house and the children while men go out and work to provide for them. Those type of expectations are especially put on Latina women. My family would always tell me that if I didn’t go to college, then I would be expected to find a man that could provide for me because I wouldn’t go far in life without a man next to my side. Or that I would get pregnant and regret it later on. This made me begin to create negative thoughts in my head–I wasn’t good enough. Or I’m not college material, I’m not capable of finishing college and finding my dream job. There were times where I got so upset, even when I did come to college. But, then I would remember stories about Sonia Sotomayor becoming the first Latina in the Supreme Court, or Gina Rodriguez winning a Golden Globe award for Best Actress in Jane the Virgin.  Continue reading “Latina Women take the Lead!”

Advertisements

The Rise of Strong Women in Pop Music

Black and white photo of a woman from the neck up. Her face is blurred. There is a box centered on the woman's head with the text "CONFIDENCE" and three black arrows pointing up toward the text.
Confidence Boost

By Brianna Love

In 2017, we saw a rise of strong feminist women in the Pop music genre. Women such as Hailee Steinfeld, Meghan Trainor, Miley Cyrus, Kesha, and Bea Miller, did some amazing acts to promote feminism. The acts don’t seem to go unnoticed by the young women who listen to this particular genre. From independent women to adolescent girls, the influence of these women in the spotlight promotes strength and love.

On April 28, 2017, Hailee Steinfeld released a song titled “Most Girls.” This song promotes being comfortable in who you are as a woman and appreciating the other women around us. Hailee sings: “Most girls are smart and strong and beautiful. Most girls work hard, go far we are unstoppable. Most girls, our fight to make every day, no two are the same. I wanna be like, I wanna be like most girls.” In the music video, Hailee makes it clear that the song is in response to the common saying “you’re not like most girls.” Instead of turning against each other and judging each other as a female population, “Most Girls” promotes being proud of who we are as a community of women.

Meghan Trainor’s song “I’m a Lady” complements “Most Girls” perfectly. Meghan sings: “And I don’t look like them (But I ain’t worried about it). I don’t talk like them (But I ain’t worried about it). I know I’m a gem. I ain’t worried about it, I ain’t worried about it ‘Cause I’m a lady.” There’s no need to worry if you’re not the same as someone else because that is the beauty of it all. We are not the same, but we stand together. My favorite part of this song is the lyric:

“I know I laugh too loud
And I might cry too much (come on).
To all those judgy eyes
I got a whole lotta love.” -Meghan Trainor, I’m a Lady

These are common stereotypes of women. We laugh too loud and that’s “unacceptable.” We cry too much and that’s “annoying.” We attempt to force ourselves into a tiny box that society has made for us just to fit in. Meghan is saying I’m done with that. This is who I am. So what if it’s “unacceptable” in your eyes. I’m proud to be this woman and you can no longer put me in that box. She sings: “All my girls, show them you’re a lady.
Tell the world, say that you’re proud to be a lady.”

Continue reading “The Rise of Strong Women in Pop Music”

My Week Without Makeup

makeupphoto
Photo of an eyeshadow palette

By: Paola Aguilar

Last year this video in which YouTuber Nikkie puts makeup on half of her face to show the power of makeup became viral. Nikkie originally created this video to show why she loves to wear makeup and why women shouldn’t be shamed for wearing makeup.

I loved this video and still do because anytime I tell someone how much time I spend doing my makeup every day, I always get comments like, “Why would you do that?” or “You look fine without it.” It’s irritating because I wear it for myself and not the opinions of others. I wear makeup because I enjoy applying it, finding my favorite products, and trying new beauty trends.

However, I also know that  I feel terrible about myself when I don’t wear makeup and get told that I look tired. I have an immense amount of respect for women who regularly don’t wear makeup. When I go without makeup I’m constantly worried about the criticisms of other people whether they voice them or not. Take For example Alicia Keys is now going without makeup as a rejection of our society’s beauty standards. It’s a beautiful and empowering act of rebellion but with all the backlash she’s received, it’s not welcoming territory to wander into if you’re thinking about not wearing makeup.

I started becoming dependent on makeup around the age of 13 when I had severe acne. I now have a decent amount of scaring that I still prefer to cover up. Given that, I spend an average of 30 minutes every morning applying makeup and I still feel pretty dependent upon it. Realizing my dependence on external beauty, I took it upon myself to challenge my ideas about my own beauty and go one  week without makeup.

Continue reading “My Week Without Makeup”

Greetings from the Clueless Feminist!

This blog and my monthly “Clueless Feminist Book Review” column are my official feminist coming out. I became a feminist early, for the world’s worst reason: Christmas presents. I hated pink, dresses, and baby dolls, but I kept getting them. My brother got presents that looked fun and comfortable, and, in my four-year-old mind, I knew that girls had gotten the short end of a short stick. Through elementary school my feminism remained strong; I wanted to be an altar boy and priest, and it was stupid that I couldn’t be. But in middle school, I lost my mojo. I developed the idea that feminists were strident, rude, and loud, and I didn’t think I’d fit within the movement. I grew up in a family that valued courtesy and manners, gentleness and giving. It’s fairly typical for girls to be brought up polite and yielding, but my parents raised my brother the same way. I believe in the quiet values my parents instilled in me, and I believe that manners make the world go round.

But I made a mistake. I assumed feminism had no place for a quiet girl like me, and I hesitated to add my voice to the movement. Certainly, feminism has a need for loud, confident, and bold voices. But there is also space for other styles and personalities. Indeed, feminism is about valuing, respecting, and strengthening voices. Continue reading “Greetings from the Clueless Feminist!”