Drinking & Safety on Spring Break

Image of a group of students in swim suits on a spring break trip at the beach.
Spring Breakers

By Brianna Love

With University of Idaho’s Spring Break just a week away, it seems fitting to address the activities and dangers that come with it. Binge drinking, embarrassment, sexual assault, kidnapping, trafficking, and various other dangers are always lurking in the corner.

A stereotypical, college spring break could either be the best or the worst time of your life. The primary contributor to students regretting their spring break is binge drinking.

What exactly is binge drinking?

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#PINKBus & Feminism

A side-angle image of a pink tour bus with white polka dots that says
Victoria’s Secret PINK Tour Bus

By  Brianna Love

On Thursday, Feb. 18, the Victoria’s Secret PINK Tour Bus stopped by at the University of Idaho campus. The bus brought with it a lot of controversy. Should this be allowed on university campuses?

Well, why shouldn’t it be allowed on campuses? This great marketing strategy for the PINK brand allows students to shop brand new products on their own campus. For students at the University of Idaho, this is a treat because there is no local PINK store.

Does this go against what feminism stands for?

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Gender inclusive housing

By Kali Nelson

A brick building meant for students to live at on a college campus.
A side photo of dorms building on a college campus.

When you think about it, housing options are a small thing in the larger scheme of going to college. In between filling out my FAFSA for the first headache inducing time to finding a decent packing list that didn’t cost upwards of $100, I didn’t think about where I would live. I knew for sure it would be on campus because freshmen are required to live on campus at the University of Idaho, and I went in knowing no one, so off campus wasn’t an option.

But as a straight cis-identifying woman, I didn’t think about if I would be comfortable with my new roommate, because I knew it would be another female like myself. Continue reading “Gender inclusive housing”

A Day In The Life Of A Married College Girl

By: Madelyn Starritt

I am a busy girl, I go to school full time, have a job and a husband. I have a routine, a set schedule for what I do most days of the week but it is almost always go, go, go, rush on to the next thing I have to do and then go home and take a nap. I never actually take a minute and think about the things I get to experience in a day or how it makes me feel, so welcome to my journey! I have decided to document a day in my week to actually think about the things I do and feel and I’m bringing you all with me. Welcome to my Thursday complete with pictures and descriptions.

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Sexism in the Academic World

By Kali Nelson

 I have always been told that I would one day go on to school after high school whether it be trade school, community college, or a 4-year school, it was always in my sight. I know my parents are setting me up to succeed, but college alone will not help me. I need to put in 110% to whatever it is I plan to do because if not I may be stuck somewhere I don’t want to be. My parents expect all three of their kids to get to college. Maybe they know, maybe they don’t, but the academic world is sexist.

 Throughout this post I will talk a lot about how women face sexism but this does apply to all minorities in the academic life. The main reason for this is because there haven’t been many studies done to see this aspect.

 Higher education has this illusion of being a white boys club. But women have been flooding the ranks of academic life for years now. In 2015, Time magazine reported that 37.5% of women between the ages of 25 to 34 had a bachelor’s degree, while only 29.5% of men did.  Despite these great numbers, women still face sexism in higher education. Let’s look at how many men compared to women get tenure in 2012. According to the American Association of University Professors, 62% were male and 44% of women. This is only startling if you look at what many universities base tenure on: reviews and publications. Reviews are left by students, mostly as the semester has ended, but can also be left on other websites like “Rate Your Professor”. These reviews usually are harsher on the women professors than they are on men. While this is not the students complete fault it has to do with society.

 Women in academia also have to handle the citation gap. This means that articles written by women received fewer citations then articles written by men. While the article I linked to says that the gap may be small it is detrimental to women because if their article is not cited, the women who wrote it cannot get credit for what they have contributed. Another thing that affects women negatively is the baby penalty. The women who want to get to the top of academic life usually must choose between having a family or having a high position. Women who want a family usually become a second tier faculty member. They fill part time positions or adjunct faculty spots. This hurts women but not men, men having a family actually helps their career.

 Women also have the problem of fighting the idea that sexism is dead in academia. It isn’t, women feel they have to work twice as hard to get the same position. While academia is lightening its attitude towards women it is still a hostile environment or them, some women may some of the only ones in their field. This causes a problem because how can women have equality if there are only a few in a huge field then how do they rise up to be equals.

 There is also the imposter syndrome. This is the feeling that no matter how qualified you are at what you’re doing, your colleges will find out that you shouldn’t be there. I suffer from this a lot. I recently got a job this summer and when I got to the meeting and I met everyone else, I felt that there had been a mistake. I couldn’t be qualified for this, I had so little experience, I felt that I had taken someone way more qualified for the job. This also happened when I got the ok for this position on this blog.  I thought that there were so many more qualified people to do this job, who was I a fairly well off, white girl to tell people what I thought about feminism. I know in my head that I am qualified to talk about feminism because I am a woman. Feminism is not just for one group but I still doubted myself about if I could do it. This is the impostor syndrome, now no matter how qualified I am for a position I still doubt. I had so little confidence in myself, I still think that sometimes I must work twice as hard to even compare with my male counterparts. This problem is not just me, it applies to every woman. This is not helpful to women, trust me, it has led to worry and stress and no sleep because anything less than perfect in anything I do is seen as a failure. People think I act like I’m smart because I like to, no I do it because I’m afraid that people will realize I shouldn’t be here. It’s terrifying. It has taken me a semester to get over the feeling that has plagued me for over a year, and I’m still not even close to over it. Every time I apply for something I trick myself to believe that I am not qualified for it, even if I am more than qualified.

 This is not something to be proud of, I work myself to the bone so that I may feel that I am adequate enough for a job. Women do not need all this extra pressure. We have so many other pressures to escape. I cannot speak for my counterparts but I continued on with school to escape this hell. I came to college to get away from the fear that the world put in me and I have found all new problems to face and one of them is sexism in college.

Secrets: Keep them or Give them all away

By Lauren Anthony

1-PostSecretSharing secrets and keeping them has become a norm. It gives us a chance to confine in someone close and know that they will protect what we have shared. Even media shares the use of keeping secrets such as the catchy theme song from Pretty Little Liars to letting go of all the secrets one holds with One Republic’s song Secrets.

Women seem to be notoriously known for gossiping and their inability to keep secrets, especially from husbands. It is also stated that they cannot keep secrets long and that is not good. Everyone keeps secrets, but the focus tends to be primarily on women. Focusing on that aspect, I will be sharing the damage of keeping secrets, how others in society view women keeping secrets, but also some outlets where everyone is allowed to share their secrets in a safe place.

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