Even Now, Black Lives Matter

Black women march holding a sign reading "#blacklivesmatter."
Leaders of the Black Lives Matter movement march following the police shootings of innocent black men.

By Rosemary Anderson

Like most Americans, the Black Lives Matter movement was introduced to me through social media. My Instagram and Facebook feeds were flooded with images, videos, and hashtags condemning the unjust shootings of innocent black men and women by law enforcement. I was onboard with its message immediately. However, the movement also left some people confused and alienated. For some, its online presence was overwhelming and not something they wanted to affiliate themselves with.

So what really is “Black Lives Matter” and how did it start? For those who are afraid to ask, I might have some answers.

Continue reading “Even Now, Black Lives Matter”

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The Hunting Ground: Sexual Assault on College Campuses

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Picture Credit: The Hunting Ground documentary showing college students’ march outside UNC against sexual assault

By Samragyee Gautam.

When I first heard about a documentary called “Hunting Ground”, my mind assumed it was some sci-fi story. But it had nothing to do with fantasy or any interesting stories. It is the real and sad truth about sexual assault in college and how, despite being such major problem, universities choose not to take this matter seriously.

The showing of this documentary, organized by Generation Action; a club on campus that advocates for sexual health rights, and sponsored by Dean of Students of University of Idaho, took place this Tuesday on November 07 at the Whitewater Room, Commons. As an active member of the club and a supporter of sex education, I thought it was a powerful and important event. We had a good number of people participate. The one and half hour showing of the documentary was followed by some questions from the audience members to the panelists who covered the topics of the sexual assault rate and reporting on college campuses. Continue reading “The Hunting Ground: Sexual Assault on College Campuses”

Music: It’s Queer AF

Madonna kissing her ex-girlfriend Sandra Bernhard.

 

By Rosemary Anderson

So I have to be honest. I have a severe addiction to Instagram. It’s bad. I check Instagram at night before I go to bed, during my walk between classes, while I put on eyeliner before work, when my mom is talking to me about finances — the list literally never ends.

While trying to calculate exactly how many hours a day I spend in Instagram’s clutches, I stumbled upon a picture that almost made me cry. (Sad, right?) Kehlani, a pop singer and dancer, posted a picture with her girlfriend.

Wait a second. Girlfriend?! I had to blink a couple of times. Okay woah, I had no idea Kehlani was bisexual. I had been listening to her music for the last five years and didn’t know she was just like me. An openly queer woman, unafraid to show her love on a public platform.

I got curious. How many musicians we listen to on the radio everyday are bisexual? How many live openly and are unafraid to share their stories with the world’s eyes on them?

Continue reading “Music: It’s Queer AF”

The Women of the Alt-Right

A previously posted open-sourced photograph of Lana Lokteff was removed because she did not consent to her image being published in association with this article.

By Rosemary Anderson

The American alt-right movement wants to strip women of the right to vote, allow men to use violent tactics to “keep women in line,” and force women back into the home–but alt-right men are not the only ones who support these statements. Women do too.

With the rise of the alt-right, increasingly more women have become involved in the movement.

Racism, sexism, transphobia, homophobia, anti-Semitism, antifeminism: all are words that can describe the alt-right. So how do people get involved in the first place? Specifically, how do women get involved?

Continue reading “The Women of the Alt-Right”

WOMEN, PEACE AND ENVIRONMENT.

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Author taking a picture with Dr. Shirin Edadi during her book signing.

By Samragyee Gautam.

“When you believe in the gold you have, you get stronger”, said Dr. Shirin Ebadi, a Nobel Prize winner and human right activist. Dr. Ebadi was the keynote speaker of the 70th Annual Borah Symposium held at UofI on Monday. As a human rights and democracy advocate, she covered many issues related to global peace and environment including ‘The Role of women in environmental protection.’

Her speech made it very clear that though environmental conservation and global peace is a collaborative effort of all people in the world, the role of women determines how the problem can be eliminated or eradicated. She stated that “Peace is a culture that has to be taught at a very young age”, and one should learn to take care of the environment from the beginning because it is our home. That is why education about peace and environment is not just important to be taught in school but also in our homes. As stated by a popular saying, ‘Home is often our first school and mother is often our first teacher.’ Educating women about the importance of peace and environment, means others will be educated about peace and environment as well. Continue reading “WOMEN, PEACE AND ENVIRONMENT.”

It’s Hard: How to Deal with Anxiety

Womxn in a ponytail meditating in a field with the sun shinning behind her.
There are many preventative measures for people who struggle with anxiety.

By Rosemary Anderson

Red light. You’re dying. You must be dying. You never thought you’d die in a Volkswagen.

Green light. Your heart beats uncontrollably. So loudly you can hear it over Katy Perry on the radio. Your chest throbs as if she also hit you in the torso with a baseball bat.

Left turn. Your legs and arms go numb, making it hard to grip the wheel. You start singing every church song you can remember from Sunday school.

Red light. You can’t see. You check your phone to call 911 but you can’t see the numbers. Everything is blurry–the lights, the cars, your mind. You’re on the verge of passing out.

Left turn. Breathing becomes painful. You take a breath as if your car is floating under water, your mind floating somewhere above your car.  

Red light. Your body begins to shake uncontrollably. You see a police car at the next intersection. You begin to formulate a plan to flag him down and tell him you’re dying. But you don’t know how to do this, so you keep driving home.

Continue reading “It’s Hard: How to Deal with Anxiety”

A Hero in Her Own Words

A portrait of Margaret Witt in her air force uniform.
A hero for the LGBTQIA+ community is coming to the UI campus this week.

By Rosemary Anderson

America has seen firsthand the creation of discriminatory policies in its history, but it has also seen these policies be overturned in favor of equality. To this day, people are working hard to have their voice heard and represented in American society. But it takes a special person to destroy a prejudiced institution, armed with nothing but their own bravery.

Luckily for UI students, we have the opportunity to meet and hear from one of these special people: Major Margaret Witt – an activist, an author, a wife, and a woman who made way for LGBTQIA+ people to serve openly in the military.

Maj.  Witt had an exemplary career with the U.S. Air Force and Air Force Reserves until she was discharged in 2007 under the policy known as “Don’t Ask, Don’t Tell.” The policy prohibited known gays and lesbians from serving in the U.S. military and expulsed more than 13,000 gay servicemen and women already enlisted.

Continue reading “A Hero in Her Own Words”