Much Ado about Breasts

Pictured are the backs of two womxn, one without a bra and one with. The womxn not wearing the bra has "Free the Nipple" written across their back.
Womxn around the world have come together to support the “Free the Nipple” campaign which acts to destigmatize womxn’s breasts.

By Rachel (Rosemary) Anderson

“I appreciate that you don’t wear bras, but, just so you know, your boobs will get really saggy when you get older.”

Thanks mom.

Although we have come a long way since the bra-burning second wave of feminism she’s used to, breasts and feminism are still bosom buddies.

With the Free the Nipple movement gaining popularity, many womxn are acknowledging how absurd it is that the public can see the entirety of someone’s breast tissue, but oh god no! Not the nipple! How could you?! It’s just too much!

Everyone’s nipples look the same regardless of gender, but some people just haven’t latched on to that message. To combat the nipple discrimination, some businesses have created campaigns that sell T-shirts and swim tops that cover a womxn’s nipple with a man’s nipple. Some medical centers have even created informative breast cancer screening videos using a man’s breast as he stands in front of a womxn.

When a womxn’s breast is exposed on TV (Janet Jackson’s Superbowl scandal, anyone?), it is somehow more offensive to viewers than characters violently murdered on screen. This promotes the message that nipples are worse than crime. Nipples are crime.

Continue reading “Much Ado about Breasts”

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Love or Livelihood: Women’s Choice?

 

Image result for maternity leave
“Please excuse me as a take a little time off to create life” picphotos.net/maternity-leave

 

I was recently sitting in one of my Journalism and Mass Media courses “interviewing” one of the female faculty here on campus who is a professor in the JAMM major, and something struck me as she spoke. During the “interview,” she spoke about the fact that female journalists find it hard to get ahead in the industry not only because of sexism within it, but also because being successful as a journalist while also having a family is extremely difficult. She said that because it’s incredibly difficult to be a journalist and report on breaking news if you have children that need to be taken care of and can’t travel freely. Now, since I want to be a successful journalist while also having a family, this concerned me. It made me think that there is the possibility that I will have to give up one for the other. Continue reading “Love or Livelihood: Women’s Choice?”

Let’s Talk About D.C

By: Tatiana Rodriguez

During the year of 2017 over a dozen black and Latina girls have gone missing in Washington D.C, but media outlets are not covering this issue. According to Times online, these girls went missing between March 19 and March 24. Social media outlets, like Twitter, quickly picked up the story and spread like wildfire. Social media users critiqued police for their lack of outcry for these missing girls.
I have seen these photographs of the young girls all over my twitter feed and have seen celebrities like Gabriel Union and Chrissy Teigen retweet stories and question why there hasn’t been much done to find these girls.

Continue reading “Let’s Talk About D.C”

My Old Pals, Ana & Mia.

National Eating Disorder Awareness week, NEDA for short, was from February 26th to March 4th, and aimed to spotlight eating disorders and provide life-saving resources to those who need it. It’s time to talk about eating disorders and the many gripping holds it has on people’s lives.

From excessively counting calories or straight up purging yourself, eating disorders are terrifying and quickly overwhelm your life. Health should come from within.
Continue reading “My Old Pals, Ana & Mia.”

The Ultimate Spring Break?

 

Image result for college spring break
Picture taken from: http://www.ranker.com/list/best-spring-break-destinations/island-hopper-dan

 

The generic college dream is to spend spring break on the beach, in a swimsuit, with loud music and people to party with. The “College Spring Break” ideal has been broadcasted through movies, showing a radical time with no consequences where anything goes. And this idea seems to stick with students for some reason. Rather than going on a weeklong hiking trip or going to save the pandas, a lot of college students seem to choose to have the beach free-for-all of every movie’s dreams. I never thought that I would be into that at all. I’m more of a save the pandas kind of type and not a huge partier. I can go weeks without drinking or partying or basically doing anything related to it and I will freely admit I am more of an introverted homebody. But this spring break I decided to go to Cabo San Lucas, Mexico and see what the “College Spring Break” was like. Continue reading “The Ultimate Spring Break?”

Vagina Monologues: Still Making a Difference 22 Years Later

vaginamonologues
Image with text “The Vagina Monologues”

By: Paola Aguilar

When I first went to see The Vagina Monologues, I had no idea what to expect. I should not have been surprised to find that it was a collection of monologues about vaginas. The Vagina Monologues was first written in 1994 by Eve Ensler and is based on dozens of interviews. The play addresses issues with sexuality, rape, and violence against women. What is so powerful about TVM is not only the array of topics which are openly addressed, but the contributions the production makes to the V-Day campaign. The movement was established on Valentine’s Day in 1998 in New York City. The mission of V-Day is to end violence to women and girls around the world. As part of V-Day, proceeds from The Vagina Monologues are directed to local organizations that work to end violence against women and girls. Here in Moscow, the production of TVM benefits Alternatives to Violence of the Palouse.

Continue reading “Vagina Monologues: Still Making a Difference 22 Years Later”

“It Happens” Photo Series Challenges the Stereotypes Associated with Sexual Assault

By Olivia Heersink

(Trigger warning: the following post contains images and dialogue related to sexual assault.)

From the innocence of adolescence through adulthood, women in our society are internalizing fear and silence. Most women begin their preparations for sexual assault at a young age, and are well-versed in the precautions they must take before they reach adulthood. In fact, avoiding being raped is an epidemic for women in our society. On average, there are 288,820 victims of rape and sexual assault each year in the United States, alone.

We teach women how not to be raped rather than teaching men about consent, respect, and mutual sexual expression. Not surprisingly, this strategy is ineffective at best. Every two minutes another American is sexually assaulted.

Sex crimes are unique because they are extremely private yet prevalent. Every sexual assault is unique to the victim; yet so many women, and sometimes men, have had similar experiences. Falling victim to a sex crime is an experience that makes the victim feel ashamed of something that happened to their own body.

Continue reading ““It Happens” Photo Series Challenges the Stereotypes Associated with Sexual Assault”